Tag Archives: History

Now Online! Presidential Papers – Love and Heartbreak, War and Politics | Library of Congress Blog

June 1, 2021 by Wendi Maloney

This story first appeared in the Library of Congress Magazine.

Above image: Woodrow Wilson, a man in love. Prints and Photographs Division. 

When President Woodrow Wilson’s name comes up, romance isn’t typically the first thing that comes to mind.

Yet, late on May 7, 1915, the recently widowed president penned these words to Edith Bolling Galt, days after confessing his love for her: “I know you can give me more, if you will but think only of your own heart and me, and shut the circumstances of the world out.”

That day, the circumstances of the world were weighing heavily on Wilson’s mind. Earlier, a German U-boat had torpedoed the British-owned luxury liner RMS Lusitania, killing 1,195 people, including 128 Americans. Wilson spent his afternoon and evening receiving updates about the horrific attack that threatened U.S. neutrality in a war that had already engulfed Europe and would eventually draw in the United States.

Researchers using Wilson’s papers at the Library may be surprised to encounter the private — and passionate — Wilson behind the formal and somewhat aloof public figure they recall from history books or World War I-era film footage.

“I must do everything I can for your happiness and mine,” Wilson continued. “I am pleading for my life.”

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: https://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2021/06/now-online-presidential-papers-love-and-heartbreak-war-and-politics/?loclr=ealocb

Remembering the Fallen in Photographs | Picture This: Library of Congress Prints & Photos

May 25, 2018 by Kristi Finefield

Grave decorated on Decoration Day. Photo by Arthur S. Siegel, 1943 June. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8d30357

One of the most enduring traditions of Memorial Day is the decoration of the graves of fallen service members with such items as flowers and American flags.

This annual day of commemoration was at one time referred to as Decoration Day because of this practice. My grandmother grew up in the deep South, where tradition held that you took an annual pilgrimage to your family cemetery, which in their case required a road trip to southern Arkansas, to clean and decorate the graves of all of your ancestors.

This tradition may have inspired the post Civil War movement to decorate the graves of those who died in military service. While the holiday was referred to as both Decoration Day and Memorial Day for decades, Memorial Day was declared a federal holiday in 1971 and is now celebrated on the last Monday in May.

Gestures of respect and commemoration on Memorial Day are made in acts both small and large, personal and ceremonial. Gratitude for the sacrifice and service of millions of American men and women takes place in all parts of the world, in countries where service members fell fighting as well as at memorials in the United States. Journey to the graves in Arlington National Cemetery, in small rural cemeteries and in foreign lands, and travel to battlefields and memorials where many are named and remembered through the images below.

Source: Remembering the Fallen in Photographs | Picture This: Library of Congress Prints & Photos

Comparing unexpected major victories by Tiger and Phil | theScore.com

Eric Patterson, 2d ago

Screenshot…

Tiger Woods will always have the upper hand over Phil Mickelson in terms of career accomplishments.

Eighty-two wins and 15 major victories put Woods in rarified air only Jack Nicklaus can relate to.

Unfortunately for Mickelson, he’s been compared to him throughout his career and will be seen as second best.

In fact, barring some drastic return to elite form, Mickelson will end his career without ever reaching No. 1 in the world.

Source: Comparing unexpected major victories by Tiger and Phil | theScore.com

Happy ending for Warwick’s bookstore as local investors step in to save the day – The San Diego Union-Tribune

With the store facing an uncertain future, investors bought the building that houses it

By John Wilkens, May 2, 2021 5:55 AM PT

From left, Steve Avoyer, Nancy Warwick, and Jack McGrory at Warwick’s bookstore.
(Eduardo Contreras/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Warwick’s calls itself the oldest bookstore in America continuously owned and operated by the same family.

This is its 125th year in business, the last 70 of them in a building on Girard Avenue in La Jolla.

A couple of months ago, fourth-generation owner Nancy Warwick got unexpected news that made her wonder how much longer the store would be in existence.

Her longtime landlord had received an unsolicited, $8.3 million bid — all cash — to buy the building.

The landlord had accepted. Warwick, who had been negotiating a new lease, was given 15 days to beat the offer or face an uncertain future with a new landlord.

Source: Happy ending for Warwick’s bookstore as local investors step in to save the day – The San Diego Union-Tribune

You Have To See These 15 Photos Of Charleston In Bloom – Explore Charleston Blog

By Insider’s Guide, Explore Charleston

From article..

One of our favorite springtime activities is simply going for a stroll through the quiet streets of Charleston!

From the crepe myrtles to the magnolia trees to the jasmine, you’ll find something beautiful in bloom around every corner you turn.

Grab your camera, lose your map and get ready to be inspired by the heavenly flora of the South!

Source: You Have To See These 15 Photos Of Charleston In Bloom – Explore Charleston Blog