Tag Archives: History

Happy ending for Warwick’s bookstore as local investors step in to save the day – The San Diego Union-Tribune

With the store facing an uncertain future, investors bought the building that houses it

By John Wilkens, May 2, 2021 5:55 AM PT

From left, Steve Avoyer, Nancy Warwick, and Jack McGrory at Warwick’s bookstore.
(Eduardo Contreras/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Warwick’s calls itself the oldest bookstore in America continuously owned and operated by the same family.

This is its 125th year in business, the last 70 of them in a building on Girard Avenue in La Jolla.

A couple of months ago, fourth-generation owner Nancy Warwick got unexpected news that made her wonder how much longer the store would be in existence.

Her longtime landlord had received an unsolicited, $8.3 million bid — all cash — to buy the building.

The landlord had accepted. Warwick, who had been negotiating a new lease, was given 15 days to beat the offer or face an uncertain future with a new landlord.

Source: Happy ending for Warwick’s bookstore as local investors step in to save the day – The San Diego Union-Tribune

You Have To See These 15 Photos Of Charleston In Bloom – Explore Charleston Blog

By Insider’s Guide, Explore Charleston

From article..

One of our favorite springtime activities is simply going for a stroll through the quiet streets of Charleston!

From the crepe myrtles to the magnolia trees to the jasmine, you’ll find something beautiful in bloom around every corner you turn.

Grab your camera, lose your map and get ready to be inspired by the heavenly flora of the South!

Source: You Have To See These 15 Photos Of Charleston In Bloom – Explore Charleston Blog

The Doomed, Would-Be Celebrity Paradise That Still Haunts Myrtle Beach | Vanity Fair

Now known for T-shirt shops and mini golf, the South Carolina beach town was once imagined as a star-studded stopover between New York and Miami. Its failure set a precedent.

By Nicole Jones, April 16, 2021

Michael Snell / Alamy Stock Photo

It glittered like a cursed diamond sculpted and set in a gold band of pristine beach in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. A vision of one man’s utopia. A marker to guide planes and ships from miles away. A hurricane shelter during a once-in-a generation storm. A movie star hangout. A gambling den (allegedly). A military lookout during World War II when rumors of German U-boats cruising off the coast surfaced more than the enemy did. It was the Ocean Forest Hotel, a spare-no-expenses resort built halfway between New York City and Miami Beach to bring in the rich and famous and anyone who wanted to hobnob with them. In the tradition of ideas destined to become a marvelous success, it was a heartbreaking failure—transformed finally into a fading memory by a few sticks of dynamite.

The Ocean Forest Hotel was many things to many people over the span of its short life, but before it was anything—before it got blown up—it was the dream of one John T. Woodside. Imagine it is 1926, and a linen-suited, cigar-smoking, youngish millionaire aspires Gatsby-esque to the Champagne high life that may have eluded him and his wealth in the rural South. Imagine him a textile magnate turned banker turned hotelier turned real estate mogul turned full-time dreamer of big-time dreams.

Buy Low Country on Amazon or Bookshop.

Buy Low Country on Amazon or Bookshop.

–Article author’s book

When it wasn’t called the million-dollar hotel, it was called the “wedding cake hotel.”

Editor’s Note: The article references and links to another good article, from 2019, about the hotel.. see screenshot below…
Screenshot of another article about the hotel…

Source: The Doomed, Would-Be Celebrity Paradise That Still Haunts Myrtle Beach | Vanity Fair

Shakespeare and Company Project

Recreating the world of the Lost Generation in interwar Paris

Gertrude Stein. James Joyce. Ernest Hemingway. Aimé Césaire. Simone de Beauvoir. Jacques Lacan. Walter Benjamin.

All these writers were members of the Shakespeare and Company lending library.

In 1919, an American named Sylvia Beach opened Shakespeare and Company, an English-language bookshop and lending library in Paris.

Almost immediately, it became the home away from home for a community of expatriate writers and artists now known as the Lost Generation. In 1922, she published James Joyce’s Ulysses under the Shakespeare and Company imprint, a feat that made her—and her bookshop and lending library—famous around the world. In the 1930s, she catered increasingly to French intellectuals, supplying English-language books and magazines from the recently rediscovered Moby-Dick to the latest issues of The New Yorker.

In 1941, she preemptively closed Shakespeare and Company after refusing to sell her last copy of Joyce’s Finnegans Wake to a Nazi officer.

Source: Shakespeare and Company Project

Secondary Source: The Scout Report, March 26, 2021 issue

Asian Americans | Film Series | PBS

Now Streaming

Asian Americans is a five-hour film series that delivers a bold, fresh perspective on a history that matters today, more than ever.

As America becomes more diverse, and more divided, while facing unimaginable challenges, how do we move forward together?

Told through intimate and personal lives, the series will cast a new lens on U.S. history and the ongoing role that Asian Americans have played in shaping the nation’s story.

Source: Asian Americans | Film Series | PBS