Category Archives: Arts & Humanities

Arts & Humanities

Artificial Intelligence and the Research Paper: A Librarian’s Perspective – News | SMU Libraries

By: Jonathan McMichael, Undergraduate Success Librarian
Screenshot…

AI writing can mimic style, but it cannot mimic substance yet. The release of a powerful, free and easy-to-use large language model platform, Open AI’s ChatGPT, raises interesting questions about the future of writing in higher education.

As the Undergraduate Success Librarian, I have a unique perspective on generative AI, like ChatGPT, that I want to share along with some advice for instructors and students on adapting to AI’s presence in higher education.

What is ChatGPT?

How does it work? ChatGPT is an interface that allows you to interact with artificial intelligence through text inputs and responses. The AI on the other side of the interface is a language model called GPT-3. It produces human-like text by parsing and analyzing the massive corpus of text information (large language) it has been trained on to predict what is likely to come next in a string of words. This makes GPT-3 a type of Generative AI because it uses machine learning to generate new content based on a given set of input data. So, when you give ChatGPT a prompt like “describe losing your sock in the dryer in the style of the declaration of independence” it (in simplified terms) identifies relevant data within its large language dataset, notices patterns within that dataset and then generates a set of text that seems most like the things it identified.*

Editor’s Note: Source was Library Link of the Day
http://www.tk421.net/librarylink/  (archive, rss, subscribe options)

Source: Artificial Intelligence and the Research Paper: A Librarian’s Perspective – News

Bewitched by TV Themes | Library of Congress Blog | Library of Congress

By Mark Hartsell, January 23, 2023

The sheet music for “Jeannie,” the theme song to the hit TV show. Music Division.

Most folks know the ridiculously catchy instrumental theme song for the 1960s classic TV comedy “I Dream of Jeannie.” But how many can recite its lyrics — “Jeannie, fresh as a daisy! / Just love how she obeys me” — or even knew it had any?

The theme for “Bewitched,” another ’60s favorite, briefly had its day: Peggy Lee, among others, recorded a jazzy vocal version in 1965. The lyrics weren’t used in the series, however, and over many decades of reruns faded from public consciousness.

The original lyrics for both songs, and countless others, are preserved in Library collections as submissions to the U.S. Copyright Office, which is part of the Library. Such submissions for registration help preserve mostly forgotten stories about pop culture staples: They chronicle the creators’ original ideas and, sometimes, the subsequent histories of their works.

Source: Bewitched by TV Themes | Library of Congress Blog

Banned and Challenged: Restricting access to books in the U.S. : NPR

A series on books that are facing challenges to their placement in libraries in some areas around the U.S.

Special Series

Banned and Challenged: Restricting access to books in the U.S.

First in series…

Author George M. Johnson: We must ensure access to those who need these stories most

All Boys Aren’t Blue, a memoir for teens and young adults about growing up Black and queer, appeared on many “best books” lists when published in 2020. It’s being challenged in some U.S. counties.

Source: Banned and Challenged: Restricting access to books in the U.S. : NPR

The Complete Sherlock Holmes : Sir Arthur Conan Doyle : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

The Complete Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Publication date 1927 Publisher doubleday & company, inc. Collection internet archive books Digitizing sponsor Kahle/Austin Foundation Contributor Internet Archive Language English Volume 2

title page…

Editor’s Note: Now free of copyright, multiple versions available for download. See also Volume 1

Source: The Complete Sherlock Holmes : Sir Arthur Conan Doyle : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

The Art of the Murder Mystery: The 10 Best Whodunits, Ranked | MOVIEWEB

By Brian Hawkins, Published 5 days ago

Paramount Pictures

Murder, mystery, intrigue, and the machinations of the macbre hold a lot of what movie-goers find most entertaining and thrilling about storytelling.

Found within the idea of not-knowing, the classic “Whodunit?” offers something in the foundation of its conception that other genres do not: An active role for each viewer as a guest-detective.

The best murder mysteries/whodunits do just that, they bring the audience into the story, taking them on a ride, introducing characters, obstacles, and setting, to deliver the poignant punch of mystery.

This mystery is what captivates each movie-goer and puts them on both a chase and a race to the finish line, as viewers are tantalized by the mystery and galvanized in their participant-watcher role of both trying to inwardly figure out “who did it” while watching the plot unfold toward the ultimate revelation that either confirms their suspicions or gives them the best “A-Ha!” moment.

Over the years, there have been several movies that have done this extremely well. Here are some of those, ranked.

10/10 Clue (1985)

Clue (1985)
Guber-Peters Company

Based on the original board game of the same name, Clue revolves around six guests who are mysteriously invited to a mansion for a dinner, but when the host of the dinner is murdered, the guests and the attending staff are all suspects as they attempt to figure out who is the killer. The movie is considered a brilliant comedy while simultaneously offering a great mystery to solve.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: The Art of the Murder Mystery: The 10 Best Whodunits, Ranked

(49) Hail and farewell: Those we lost in 2022 – YouTube | CBS Sunday Morning

(49) Hail and farewell: Those we lost in 2022 – YouTube

318,858 views, Jan 1, 2023, by CBS Sunday Morning

#obituaries “Sunday Morning” remembers some of the newsworthy men and women who passed away this year – statesmen and women, athletes, artists and storytellers who pushed boundaries, defied expectations, and inspired generations with their creativity and humanity. Lee Cowan reports. #hailandfarewell #obituaries

Source: (49) Hail and farewell: Those we lost in 2022 – YouTube