Category Archives: Memories & History

Memories & History

Brain development: The myth the brain “matures” when you’re 25 | Slate

A powerful idea about human development stormed pop culture and changed how we see one another. It’s mostly bunk.

By Jane C. Hu, November 27, 20227:00 PM

Illustrations by Rey Velasquez Sagcal

When Leonardo DiCaprio’s relationship with model/actress Camila Morrone ended three months after she celebrated her 25th birthday, the lifestyle site YourTango turned to neuroscience.

DiCaprio has a well-documented history of dating women under 25. (His current flame, who is 27, is a rare exception.) “Given that DiCaprio’s cut-off point is exactly around the time that neuroscientists say our brains are finished developing, there is certainly a case to be made that a desire to date younger partners comes from a desire to have control,” the article said. It quotes a couples therapist, who says that at 25, people’s “brains are fully formed and that presents a more elevated and conscious level of connection”—the type of connection, YourTango suggests, that DiCaprio wants to avoid.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: Brain development: The myth the brain “matures” when you’re 25.

NPR’s 10th year of Books We Love! offers 400+ new reading recommendations : NPR

Posted November 22, 2022; Washington, D.C. – Books We Love!

NPR’s Books We Love! is back for a 10th year.
NPR

NPR’s biannual, interactive reading guide – is back for its 10th year with 400+ books published in 2022!

Mix and match tags including “Book Club Ideas,” “Eye-Opening Reads,” and “Kids’ Books” to browse titles hand-picked by NPR staff and trusted critics.

Click back through a decade of recommendations to find more than 3,200 books – we’ve got your next favorite read and something for every person on your holiday shopping list. Discover the books that comforted, challenged, and captivated us this year.

READ BOOKS WE LOVE HERE.

“There were so many great books published this year, and we’re excited to once again bring readers recommendations from our staff and freelance critics,” said Meghan Collins Sullivan, NPR’s senior books and culture editor. “This guide pulls together all of our favorite books from 2022, from a group with many varying individual interests, so readers are bound to find something that they love, too.”

This year’s recommendations come from employees across NPR including Ari Shapiro, Ayesha Rascoe, Bob Mondello, Elise Hu, Eric Deggans, Juana Summers and more. Books are featured along with links to coverage from NPR and NPR member stations.

Happy reading!

Source: NPR’s 10th year of Books We Love! offers 400+ new reading recommendations : NPR

(49) The best sci-fi novel I read as a kid [ Bill Gates ] – YouTube

By Bill Gates 2.92M subscribers

(49) The best sci-fi novel I read as a kid – YouTube

265,798 views

Posted Nov 21, 2022 — Robert Heinlein’s Stranger in a Strange Land is a fantastic story—and it was also a turning point for me as a young reader. Learn more at https://gatesnot.es/3GsUiCF

Source: (49) The best sci-fi novel I read as a kid – YouTube

3 types of normal forgetting — and 1 that isn’t | Ideas.Ted.com

September 16, 2022, By Lisa Genova

iStock

To be human is to forget things. But you’ve probably wondered: “When is forgetting normal, and when is it not?”

Here are four examples.

1. Forgetting where you parked
Not remembering where you parked because you didn’t pay attention is normal and different than what happens with Alzheimer’s. If you have Alzheimer’s, let’s say you park in a mall garage and shop for an hour. When you return to the parking garage, you’re not wondering if you parked on level three or level four, you’re thinking, “I don’t remember how I got here.” Or you’re standing in front of your car, but you don’t recognize it as yours.

Bonus:

See her TED Talk: https://www.ted.com/talks/lisa_genova_what_you_can_do_to_prevent_alzheimer_s

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: 3 types of normal forgetting — and 1 that isn’t |

The Feminist Test We Keep Failing: Lost Women of Science Podcast, Season 3 Bonus Episode – Scientific American

There’s a test that we at Lost Women of Science seem to fail again and again: the Finkbeiner Test. 

By Katie Hafner, Carol Sutton Lewis, The Lost Women of Science Initiative on November 17, 2022

Credit: Traci Mims

There’s a test that we at Lost Women of Science seem to fail again and again: the Finkbeiner Test. Named for the science writer, Ann Finkbeiner, the Finkbeiner Test is a checklist for writing profiles of female scientists without being sexist.

It includes rules like not mentioning her husband’s job, or her childcare arrangements, or how she was the “first woman to…”—all rules we break regularly on this show. In this episode, Katie Hafner talks to Christie Aschwanden, the science writer who created the test, and Ann Finkbeiner, who inspired it, to find out how they came up with these rules, and to see if there might be hope yet for our series. She reports her findings to Carol Sutton Lewis, who has a whole other set of rules for telling these stories.

Source: The Feminist Test We Keep Failing: Lost Women of Science Podcast, Season 3 Bonus Episode – Scientific American