Category Archives: Memories & History

Memories & History

The Real Places That Gave Rise to Southern Fictions | The New Yorker

By Casey Cep, January 12, 2022

“Church, Highway 47, Alabama, 2018.”

There is a cheap way of invoking the American South—common to country songs and television shows and pulpy novels—that involves setting the scene with cornfields or battlefields and setting the table with gravy and grits.

You know that you’re in the midst of it when an otherwise deracinated character drops his final “G”s and says something about livin’ high on the hog or complains about how it’s colder outside than a witch’s tit.

But it takes more than kudzu or a Mason jar to make a work of Southern fiction. A real sense of place requires something else—more verb than noun, not a thing but a way of being.

Editor’s Note; May be behind paywall, sorry…

Source: The Real Places That Gave Rise to Southern Fictions | The New Yorker

New to the Digital Collections: Dun & Bradstreet | Inside Adams: Science, Technology & Business | Library of Congress

January 10, 2022 by Natalie Burclaff

Cover page of the Reference Book. July 1901, volume 133. R.G. Dun & Company. Library of Congress Digital Collections.

The Science, Technology & Business Division is excited to announce the digital collection of Dun’s Reference Book from 1900 to 1924!

In the Business Reference Section, about 20% of the questions we receive are related to locating information on historical businesses. We use a lot of resources to answer these questions: historical newspapers, city directories and telephone books, industry lists, and insurance maps. One useful resource in our tool belt is the Dun & Bradstreet Reference Book, a credit directory, which is why we are thrilled that the volumes from 1900 to 1924 are now available online!

For those who are unfamiliar with this title, it was published starting in 1859 by the Mercantile Agency, part of R.G. Dun & Company. Dun merged with Bradstreet in 1933 and they continued producing these volumes until 2006.

Unlike other kinds of directories, which are often focused on a particular metropolitan area or type of industry, Dun’s Reference Book collection has national coverage and includes “merchants, manufacturers, and traders” in a wide range of industries from the largest cities to the smallest towns across the United States and Canada.

Source: New to the Digital Collections: Dun & Bradstreet | Inside Adams: Science, Technology & Business

Inside the upcoming Orient Express La Dolce Vita train | CNN Travel

By Tamara Hardingham-Gill, CNN • Published 30th December 2021

All aboard: Renderings of the new Orient Express La Dolce Vita, which will debut in 2023, have just been released.
Courtesy Orient Express La Dolce Vita/Accor/Dimorestudio

(CNN) — The launch of the new Orient Express La Dolce Vita might still be a while off, but it seems as though the highly anticipated service will definitely be worth the wait.

Renderings of the 11-carriage train, which pays homage to the “La Dolce Vita” period of the 1960s, have been unveiled, revealing a plush interior that looks more like a boutique hotel than a railway car.

Orient Express La Dolce Vita is to be made up of six trains, each featuring 12 “deluxe cabins,” 18 suites, an “Honour Suite” and a restaurant carriage offering a “five-star dining experience” including “award-winning Italian wines and exclusive haute cuisine.”

Source: Inside the upcoming Orient Express La Dolce Vita train | CNN Travel

What You Missed: How Rick Steves Got Hooked on Hiking – Outside Online

The travel guru discusses the adventure that fueled his newfound love for hiking

By Frederick Dreier, Dec 29, 2021

From article…

Rick Steves can point out the balconies in Milan where Mussolini gave speeches.

He knows where to order the tastiest mangalica in Budapest, Hungary.

And for more than 40 years, he has researched European travel for his popular guidebooks and television show, amassing a sizable fan base with his intricate knowledge of history, culture, and cuisine.

Prior to 2021, however, Steves had largely overlooked one major side of European travel: the great outdoors. That changed in September when Steves went on a six-day trek through the French Alps.

Source: What You Missed: How Rick Steves Got Hooked on Hiking – Outside Online

The war on culture: How conservatives and progressives joined forces to crush art | Salon.com

In battling “high art” and promoting pop culture, progressive academics became apostles of free-market capitalism

By Doug Neiss, Published December 25, 2021 12:44PM (EST)

James Joyce and Stan Lee (Photo illustration by Salon/Getty Images)

Reciting what was even by 1990 a familiar litany, a Princeton professor, in a book called “The Death of Literature,” accused advanced writers of the past 200 years of wanting nothing to do with bourgeois industrialized society except to attack it: Generations of authors have lived out the poet’s role that Wordsworth created, in life and poem, withdrawing from industrialized society and rejecting its materialist values.

Sometimes they took up their stance on the left, like Blake and Shelley, sometimes on the right like Yeats and Pound, but always, like Joyce’s Stephen Dedalus, they refused to bow — non serviam — to the bourgeois family, religion, nation, and language that they felt cast nets over their souls.

To the writer of those words, the apparent triumph of bourgeois (capitalist) democracy over fascist and communist rivals signaled what was soon to be called “the end of history.” By opting out, advanced writers had succeeded only in marginalizing themselves. Their marginalization had little to do with rejecting bourgeois democracy, however. Rather, bourgeois democracy had marginalized them for failing to measure up economically.

The same fate has befallen classical music, absent any explicit rejection of bourgeois democracy, though other face-saving excuses have been invented. On the other hand, marginalization has not befallen the most successful visual artists (whatever their politics), whose work can garner exorbitant prices and therefore respect for the vocation.

Source: The war on culture: How conservatives and progressives joined forces to crush art | Salon.com

How grief and loss affect your brain, and why it takes time to adapt : Shots – Health News : NPR

By Berly McCoy, December 20, 20212:55 PM ET

Grief is tied to all sorts of different brain functions, says researcher and author Mary-Frances O’Connor. That can range from being able to recall memories to taking the perspective of another person, to even things like regulating our heart rate and the experience of pain and suffering.
Adam Lister/Getty Images

Holidays are never quite the same after someone we love dies.

Even small aspects of a birthday or a Christmas celebration — an empty seat at the dinner table, one less gift to buy or make — can serve as jarring reminders of how our lives have been forever changed.

Although these realizations are hard to face, clinical psychologist Mary-Frances O’Connor says we shouldn’t avoid them or try to hide our feelings. “Grief is a universal experience,” she notes, “and when we can connect, it is better.”

O’Connor, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Arizona, studies what happens in our brains when we experience grief.

She says grieving is a form of learning — one that teaches us how to be in the world without someone we love in it. “The background is running all the time for people who are grieving, thinking about new habits and how they interact now.”

Source: How grief and loss affect your brain, and why it takes time to adapt : Shots – Health News : NPR