Tag Archives: The Washington Post

Vaccinated against COVID? Great; here’s why you should still wear a mask in public. | The Seattle Times

April 26, 2021 at 5:22 am | Updated April 26, 2021 at 8:37 am

A Dala horse statue in Mora, Minn., reminds residents to wear a mask. (Photo for The Washington Post by Tom Peterson).

More than 93 million Americans are fully vaccinated against the coronavirus. Despite so many invigorated immune systems, the populace still needs to keep wearing masks, public health specialists say.

The country is not yet so protected it can forgo face coverings. Case counts have spiked in some hot spots. Meanwhile, it’s clearer than ever that masks protect wearers as well as those nearby.

“Masks are one of the best interventions that we have to prevent viral transmission from one person to another,” said Lisa Maragakis, an infectious-disease epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Source: Vaccinated against COVID? Great; here’s why you should still wear a mask in public. | The Seattle Times

Six ways to stay balanced during the climate crisis – The Washington Post

Palm trees frame a home being destroyed by the Woolsey wildfire above the Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu, Calif, on Nov. 9, 2018. (Reed Saxon/AP)

By Ariella Cook-Shonkoff and Neelu Tummala, April 7, 2021 at 1:12 p.m. PDT

As vaccine rollouts allow us to plan for a post-pandemic world, we face another looming emergency: the climate crisis.

While pandemic pall is visceral, climate change can feel far off, requiring effort to remain engaged, or at a minimum, to keep paying attention.

But with our future dependent on climate action over the next nine years, it’s urgent that we zoom out of our siloed lives and step into the broader panorama. The climate crisis demands our attention.

As bicoastal medical and mental health practitioners, we are deeply concerned about the adverse health consequences of global warming, including: increased risk of heart disease and stroke, higher rates of violence, the widening spread of infectious diseases as well as the psychological toll.

Source: Six ways to stay balanced during the climate crisis – The Washington Post

A father-son backpacking trip in the Grand Canyon is an introduction to adventure – The Washington Post

The author’s son Kai hikes along the Tonto Trail on the third day of their early March backpacking trip as mist spills off the South Rim of the Grand Canyon far above. (John Briley for The Washington Post)

By John Briley, April 9, 2021 at 5:00 a.m. PDT

As intros to backpacking go, this might be pushing it. At noon on a brilliant Tuesday in March, my 12-year-old son Kai and I are a mile and a half into a four-day, 27-mile walk through the Grand Canyon — his first backpacking trip — when he asks: “Are we almost to camp?”

Um, no.

Camp, at Hermit Creek, is seven miles and nearly 2,500 vertical feet below, a trek that will take us several more hours. We’re descending the Hermit Trail, a poorly maintained path off the canyon’s South Rim, and have paused on a precipice, across which we can see many of the canyon’s neatly stacked layers: the chalky beiges and browns of the upper Kaibab, Toroweap and Coconino formations, which yield to the pinkish pastels of the Hermit, Supai and Redwall deposits below.

This is on display in cliffs hundreds of feet tall, a stark reminder of how far we have to go — and how quickly we could get there with one misstep.

Source: A father-son backpacking trip in the Grand Canyon is an introduction to adventure – The Washington Post

Baltimore restaurant owner drove 6 hours to cook for customer with cancer – The Washington Post

Steve Chu, co-owner of Baltimore’s Ekiben restaurant, holds the bag of finished entrees he and business partner Ephrem Abebe, background, made for a customer who has terminal cancer. They are standing in the parking lot of the customer’s Vermont condo building, where they cooked the food on March 13. (Brandon Jones)

By Cathy Free, March 18, 2021 at 3:00 a.m. PDT

The request came in late on a Thursday afternoon to restaurant owner Steve Chu. One of his customers had terminal cancer, and her son-in-law wondered if it would be possible to get the recipe of her favorite broccoli tempura entree so he could make it for her at her home in Vermont.

Chu, 30, specializes in Asian fusion cuisine and is the co-owner of two Ekiben locations in Baltimore. He read the email on March 11 and instantly knew that he could do better, he said.

He quickly replied with an alternative suggestion:

“Thanks for reaching out,” he wrote. “We’d like to meet you in Vermont and make it fresh for you.”

Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/2021/03/18/ekiben-restaurant-baltimore-cancer/

Amazon withholds its ebooks from libraries because it prefers you pay it instead – The Verge

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

Amazon’s publishing arm has refused to sell digital books to libraries

By Nick Statt@nickstatt, Mar 10, 2021, 1:39pm EST

Amazon is withholding ebook and audiobook versions of works it publishes through its in-house publishing arms from US libraries, according to a new report from The Washington Post. In fact, Amazon is the only major publisher that’s doing this, the report states. It’s doing so because the company thinks the terms involved with selling digital versions of books to libraries, which in turn make them available to local residents for free through ebook lending platforms like Libby, are unfavorable.

Source: Amazon withholds its ebooks from libraries because it prefers you pay it instead – The Verge