Category Archives: Current Affairs

Current Affairs

Even as shows like ‘Mare of Easttown’ create buzz, the idea of the broader TV hit is going away – The Washington Post

Astute observers of television say the idea of a unifying show on even a modest scale is gone. In its wake are a hundred Twitter niches — and a dangerous lack of common culture.

By Steven Zeitchik, June 22, 2021 at 5:00 a.m. PDT

(Emma Kumer/Washington Post illustration)

On one level, “Mare of Easttown” was a smashing success.

The Pennsylvania-set crime series starring Kate Winslet inspired numerous memes, truckloads of media coverage and even a “Saturday Night Live” parody after it debuted on HBO in April.

More importantly, thanks to its head-fake mysteries and town with more secrets than beer bottles, the show quadrupled its audience between its premiere and its finale. That’s the good news.

The bad news is that its audience began modestly enough that even with all that growth, the finale was watched by only 4 million people over Memorial Day weekend. For all its buzzy enthusiasm and hardcore fan interest, the “Mare” finale was not seen that weekend by nearly 99 percent of Americans.

The television hit — the most abiding of entertainment traditions — appears to be dying. That isn’t to say shows don’t have fans; they do, and some of them are more passionate than ever. But according to its long-standing definition — a universally recognized show that gathers a large, verifiable audience and becomes unavoidable in all the places people talk about television and endures well beyond its run — the TV hit is vanishing.

From article…

Source: Even as shows like ‘Mare of Easttown’ create buzz, the idea of the broader TV hit is going away – The Washington Post

“I Hope the Mindset Has Changed”: John Podesta Is Thrilled That Congress Finally Cares About UFOs | Vanity Fair

By Abigail Tracy, June 22, 2021

From The Washington Post/Getty Images. 

“I saw more eagles than UFOs,” John Podesta joked.

The former chief of staff to Bill Clinton and veteran of the Obama White House had just returned from a trip to Alaska and, speaking with me from California last Friday, shared his thoughts on the highly anticipated government report on unidentified flying objects, set to be released later this week.

Over the past few decades, Podesta has emerged as one of the most prominent public figures goading the Pentagon to disclose information on UFOs—or, in official channel parlance, “unidentified aerial phenomena” (UAP). In his view the report’s expected release marks a sea change in not only public sentiment, but political posturing around the issue.

“There’s always been tremendous public interest in this, but it was kind of pushed to the fringe. People were viewed as a little bit goofy if they wanted to raise the topic,” he explained. “Now I think that’s changed.”

Source: “I Hope the Mindset Has Changed”: John Podesta Is Thrilled That Congress Finally Cares About UFOs | Vanity Fair

Should you wear a mask indoors? 7 vaccinated experts share their plans

Caption: Screenshot…

Amid new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, many fully vaccinated people in the United States have been eager to hang up their masks, while others are still a little hesitant to give up the protective face coverings.

The guidance, which was released in May and said that fully vaccinated people did not need to wear masks or socially distance in indoor settings, has been adopted in most areas, though businesses are allowed to require customers wear masks or follow other safety procedures.

Some have expressed concern about not knowing the vaccination status of strangers, making them hesitant to go maskless.

Source: Should you wear a mask indoors? 7 vaccinated experts share their plans

Veterans Legacy Memorial | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Welcome to the Veterans Legacy Memorial (VLM)

Screenshot of home page…

Welcome to the Veterans Legacy Memorial (VLM).

VLM is an online memorial space managed by the National Cemetery Administration (NCA).

NCA manages more than 150 national cemeteries to honor our Nation’s Veterans, and extends memorialization of more than 3.7 million Veterans interred in those cemeteries to this digital memorial space by providing a VLM profile page for each Veteran.

To find a Veteran’s profile page, enter the Veteran’s name (First Last with no commas, such as “John Doe”). To refine your search, use the drop down menus to search by Branch of Service, War Period, and Cemetery Location. To search using additional criteria, click on Advanced Search.

Source: Veterans Legacy Memorial | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Remembering the Fallen in Photographs | Picture This: Library of Congress Prints & Photos

May 25, 2018 by Kristi Finefield

Grave decorated on Decoration Day. Photo by Arthur S. Siegel, 1943 June. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8d30357

One of the most enduring traditions of Memorial Day is the decoration of the graves of fallen service members with such items as flowers and American flags.

This annual day of commemoration was at one time referred to as Decoration Day because of this practice. My grandmother grew up in the deep South, where tradition held that you took an annual pilgrimage to your family cemetery, which in their case required a road trip to southern Arkansas, to clean and decorate the graves of all of your ancestors.

This tradition may have inspired the post Civil War movement to decorate the graves of those who died in military service. While the holiday was referred to as both Decoration Day and Memorial Day for decades, Memorial Day was declared a federal holiday in 1971 and is now celebrated on the last Monday in May.

Gestures of respect and commemoration on Memorial Day are made in acts both small and large, personal and ceremonial. Gratitude for the sacrifice and service of millions of American men and women takes place in all parts of the world, in countries where service members fell fighting as well as at memorials in the United States. Journey to the graves in Arlington National Cemetery, in small rural cemeteries and in foreign lands, and travel to battlefields and memorials where many are named and remembered through the images below.

Source: Remembering the Fallen in Photographs | Picture This: Library of Congress Prints & Photos