Category Archives: Games

Games

33 ways to practice the art of self-care – Lifestyle | Los Angeles Times

By Marielle Wakim, Jan. 13, 2022 7 AM PT

(Lively Scout / For The Times)

When you hear the phrase self-care, chances are you fall into one of two camps: You either want to retch violently or you want to raise a glass of wine in tribute (one that you’re somehow managing to drink while lying face-down on a massage table).

Arguably, both responses are valid. The practice of self-care has strayed from its radical roots — more on those in a second — and evolved into a posh solution for myriad modern-day ailments, including but certainly not limited to long workdays, tense family gatherings, political conversations, and circling the parking garage at the Grove two days before Christmas.

But in its more nascent form, self-care, which surfaced as a term in the 1950s, was far less luxurious.

Before it became synonymous with the larger wellness movement, self-care was something doctors and health professionals encouraged among elderly and mentally ill populations; everyday practices, like personal grooming, were ways to reclaim a sense of autonomy.

In the years following, academics began exploring the ways self-care might combat the stress experienced by workers in high-octane fields (think healthcare or firefighting).

The idea was simple: Taking care of oneself — whether that meant addressing a physical need like eating, or a psychological need like engaging in therapy — would more adequately allow someone to take care of others. You hear it on airplanes all the time. Put on your own oxygen mask first before helping those around you.

Source: 33 ways to practice the art of self-care – Los Angeles Times

100 Best Baseball Books Ever Written – The Best Books About Baseball | Esquire

Baseball is the writer’s game, and these indispensable books prove it.

By Alex Belth Nov 30, 2021

From article…

There are more good books written about baseball than any other American team sport—and that’s not just because baseball has been around the longest.

“This ain’t a football game,” manager Earl Weaver once said. “We do this every day.” Through baseball books, we’ve come to understand the game and its history.

The sport is catnip for writers: a game of contemplation and strategy that lends itself beautifully to numbers and analysis as well as poetry.

As longtime Washington Post writer Tom Boswell once wrote, “Conversation is the blood of baseball. It flows through the game, an invigorating system of anecdotes. Ballplayers are tale tellers who have polished their malarky and winnowed their wisdom… this passion for language and the telling detail is what makes baseball the writer’s game.”

Source: 100 Best Baseball Books Ever Written – The Best Books About Baseball

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on Significance of ‘Jeopardy!’ Host Mike Richards Resignation – The Hollywood Reporter

The columnist (and former ‘Jeopardy!’ contestant) argues that the media focus on Mike Richards’ insensitive comments misses a deeper issue with the host search that “suggests the problem may not be just a bad branch, but a rotten root.”

By Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, August 25, 2021 7:30am

THR Photo Illustration / Courtesy of Jeopardy Productions (3), Inc.; Sony Pictures Television/Everett Collection; Kris Connor/Getty Images

The focus on the sudden stepping down of newly selected Jeopardy! host Mike Richards over insensitive and out-of-touch sexist comments misses the deeper reason the show’s search for a new host has become such a dramatic public debacle.

The way the show’s producers handled the transition from the Golden Age of Trebek is just as insensitive and out-of-touch as Richards’ smarmy comments.

Even though producers recently announced the delightful Mayim Bialik — an acclaimed actor and Ph.D. in neuroscience — as the temporary host, their tone-deaf misstep suggests the problem may not be just a bad branch, but a rotten root.

Source: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on Significance of ‘Jeopardy!’ Host Mike Richards Resignation – The Hollywood Reporter

What Should the New ‘Jeopardy!’ Be? Guest Hosts Provide the Clues. – The New York Times

Following Alex Trebek’s death, a parade of replacements seem to be battling for the soul of the game — and the state of knowledge itself.

By Amanda Hess, May 5, 2021

By Cari Vander Yacht

On a recent “Jeopardy!” episode, one of the contestants, Mike Nelson, alighted upon a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

Nelson — “an actor originally from Chesterton, Indiana,” as the “Jeopardy!” announcer Johnny Gilbert introduced him — selected an $800 clue that triggered a Daily Double.

It was Anderson Cooper’s first night guest-hosting the show, but Nelson had a different man in mind as he made his wager. “I’ve always wanted to say this,” Nelson said. “Let’s make it a true Daily Double” — and here Nelson closed his eyes and lifted his hands as if to signal for some kind of celestial field goal — “Alex.”

Source: What Should the New ‘Jeopardy!’ Be? Guest Hosts Provide the Clues. – The New York Times

Baseball lifts San Diego’s spirits. Can it revive a pandemic-stricken U.S. economy? | Reuters

By Daniel Trotta, Chris Canipe, and Howard Schneider

May 6, 20218:09 AM PDT

Petco Park in San Diego celebrates the opening day for the San Diego Padres as they host the Atlanta Braves in their MLB home opening baseball game in San Diego, California April 12, 2010. REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES)

It was Saturday night in downtown San Diego, and J Street near the Petco Park baseball stadium was bustling.

Fans of the hometown Padres, many decked out in team gear, packed the bars and restaurants with more waiting in line and happy to do so after a year of pandemic lockdown.

Source: Baseball lifts San Diego’s spirits. Can it revive a pandemic-stricken U.S. economy? | Reuters

Is there a scientific case for literature? A neuroscientist novelist argues yes | Salon.com

Illogical as it might seem, there may be an evolutionary reason that humans love consuming fiction

By Erik Hoel, April 18, 2021 11:30PM (UTC)
A parent and child tell each other stories inside a cosy tent lit up in a dark room of their home (Getty Images)

You do something strange every day. You consume fictions. It’s such an omnipresent habit, shared by all, that we rarely consider the oddity of it.

I’m a fiction writer myself, but I’m also a neuroscientist, so this activity fascinates me. What’s the cognitive utility of learning things that aren’t true? We’re evolved biological beings who need to understand the world to survive, and yet all facts we learn about Hogwarts are literally false. How can any of this information be useful?

Still, fictions surround us. I grew up in my mother’s independent bookstore and I’ve been a writer since I can remember. A significant change in my lifetime is that media, like TV channels, books, magazines, and films, have been condensed into a single one-stop shop: the screen. I call this the supersensorium. Screens are now supermarkets for entertaining experiences. Such easy access to fictions means we often binge watch, we stuff our faces.

The average American adult spends about half their day consuming screen media.

–from article

Source: Is there a scientific case for literature? A neuroscientist novelist argues yes | Salon.com