Tag Archives: Coronavirus

Why Are So Many Knowledge Workers Quitting? | The New Yorker

The coronavirus pandemic threw everyone into Walden Pond.

By Cal Newport, August 16, 2021

An empty desk and chair in a sparse room.
During the pandemic, many knowledge workers have been embracing career downsizing, voluntarily reducing their work hours to emphasize other aspects of life.Photograph from Getty

Last spring, a friend of mine, a writer and executive coach named Brad Stulberg, received a troubling call from one of his clients. The client, an executive, had suddenly started losing many of his best employees, and he couldn’t really explain why. “This was the canary in the coal mine,” Stulberg said.

In the weeks that followed, more clients began sharing stories of unusually high staff attrition. “They were asking me, ‘Am I doing something wrong?’ ” Stulberg was especially well suited to help the executives he advises grasp the mind-set of their exiting employees.

Before the pandemic, Stulberg had been working on a book, “The Practice of Groundedness,” which argues for a values-based approach to defining and pursuing success. The research process led him to question his own professional situation. He lived with his wife and their young son in an apartment in Oakland, California.

He was on staff as an internal coach for Kaiser Permanente, a health-care company. He also ran his own small, community-based coaching practice, wrote books and freelance magazine articles, and delivered paid lectures. His new book emphasized the imperatives of presence and developing community ties, but Stulberg didn’t have the time to act on these principles, as he felt that he had to work constantly to keep up with the high cost of living in Oakland. “The laptop was always out,” he said.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: Why Are So Many Knowledge Workers Quitting? | The New Yorker

Rising number of Baby Boomers retirements may create ‘eye-opening’ changes, jobs, business, economy, Dayton, Kettering | Dayton daily news

Local News | July 17, 2021, By Nick Blizzard

The growing number of Baby Boomer retirements nationwide is accelerating, raising concerns locally about losing a large chunk of the workforce sooner than expected.

Data shows nearly 6 million more Boomers in the U.S. retired from October 2020 through March of this year than the same period a year prior, creating a larger void than anticipated in an economy seeking to fill jobs across an array of industries and recover from the woes of the coronavirus pandemic.

Source: Rising number of Baby Boomers retirements may create ‘eye-opening’ changes, jobs, business, economy, Dayton, Kettering

The Pandemic Led To The Biggest Drop In U.S. Life Expectancy Since WWII, Study Finds : Coronavirus Updates : NPR

June 23, 20216:32 PM ET Heard on Morning Edition, By Allison Aubrey Twitter

A COVID-19 vaccination clinic last month in Auburn, Maine. A drop in life expectancy in the U.S. stems largely from the coronavirus pandemic, a new study says.
Robert F. Bukaty/AP

A new study estimates that life expectancy in the U.S. decreased by nearly two years between 2018 and 2020, largely due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

And the declines were most pronounced among minority groups, including Black and Hispanic people. In 2018, average life expectancy in the U.S. was about 79 years (78.7). It declined to about 77 years (76.9) by the end of 2020, according to a new study published in the British Medical Journal.

“We have not seen a decrease like this since World War II. It’s a horrific decrease in life expectancy,” said Steven Woolf of the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine and an author of the study released on Wednesday.

(The study is based on data from the National Center for Health Statistics and includes simulated estimates for 2020.)

Source: The Pandemic Led To The Biggest Drop In U.S. Life Expectancy Since WWII, Study Finds : Coronavirus Updates : NPR

Should you wear a mask indoors? 7 vaccinated experts share their plans

Caption: Screenshot…

Amid new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, many fully vaccinated people in the United States have been eager to hang up their masks, while others are still a little hesitant to give up the protective face coverings.

The guidance, which was released in May and said that fully vaccinated people did not need to wear masks or socially distance in indoor settings, has been adopted in most areas, though businesses are allowed to require customers wear masks or follow other safety procedures.

Some have expressed concern about not knowing the vaccination status of strangers, making them hesitant to go maskless.

Source: Should you wear a mask indoors? 7 vaccinated experts share their plans

How older adults can get back into physical exercise following months of pandemic rules – The Washington Post

By Judith Graham, May 31, 2021 at 5:00 a.m. PDT

Photo by Mikhail Nilov on Pexels.com

Alice Herb, 88, an intrepid New Yorker, is used to walking miles around Manhattan.

But after this year of being shut inside, trying to avoid covid-19, she has noticed a big difference in how she feels. “Physically, I’m out of shape,” she told me. “The other day, I took the subway for the first time, and I was out of breath climbing two flights of stairs to the street. That’s just not me.”

Emotionally, Herb, a retired lawyer and journalist, is hesitant about resuming activities even though she’s fully vaccinated. “You wonder: What if something happens?” she said. “Maybe I shouldn’t be doing that. Maybe that’s dangerous.”

Millions of older Americans are similarly struggling with physical, emotional and cognitive challenges following a year of being cooped up inside, stopping usual activities and seeing few, if any, people. If they don’t address issues that have arisen during the pandemic — muscle weakness, poor nutrition, disrupted sleep, anxiety, social isolation and more — these older adults face the prospect of poorer health and increased frailty, experts warn.

Source: How older adults can get back into physical exercise following months of pandemic rules – The Washington Post

Have vaccine, will travel: How a road trip served as a needed jolt from the blahs at home – The Washington Post

Travel

By Kate SilverMay 21, 2021 at 7:00 a.m. PDT

The author’s husband wanted to put his refurbished car to the test on a serpentine stretch of road called Tail of the Dragon, in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains. (Shutterstock)

In early April, when my husband, Neil, and I had both secured vaccine appointments, he suggested a road trip.

He had been fixing up a sporty old car — one of his many pandemic sanity projects — and wanted to put it to the test, driving it from our home in Chicago to a serpentine stretch of road called Tail of the Dragon, in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, straddling the Tennessee and North Carolina state line.

At the same time, I had been thinking about how much I would love to see a couple of friends in North Carolina, a state I had never visited. And why not add places we had been meaning to explore to the list? Nashville, Louisville, and Dolly Parton’s Dollywood theme park rounded out the itinerary, and our first trip since December 2019 started coming together.

Source: Have vaccine, will travel: How a road trip served as a needed jolt from the blahs at home – The Washington Post