Tag Archives: Health

Offbeat | 5 books that made me get out of my own way – The Pitt News

By Jillian Rowan, Staff Writer January 9, 2022

From article…

If there were ever a time to get reading, the start of a new year is it.

Here are five publications, both traditional books and guided journals, that are sure to make 2022 your year for mental, physical and emotional wellness.

1. 101 Essays That Will Change The Way You Think “101 Essays That Will Change The Way You Think” is one of my favorite books of all time.

Brianna Wiest’s 2016 publication appropriately comprises 101 essays detailing how to pursue purpose, find peace in the daily routine and discover peace and awareness within you. Wiest, known for her philosophical works, creates literature to realign people’s inner narratives with their higher selves and potential.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: Offbeat | 5 books that made me get out of my own way – The Pitt News

The Science of a Good Nap | Science Alert

By JACINTA BOWLER, 1 JANUARY 2022

(Natalie Board/EyeEm/Getty Images)

For a society constantly trying to over-extend, over-perform, and over-deliver, skipping out on sleep may be seen as the ultimate badge of productivity.

It’s a lifestyle we most associate with the rich and powerful of the world, not to mention the hustle-drunk tech bros of Silicon Valley – but it’s not even a new thing.

Even the infamous inventor Thomas Edison was so consumed by his need to stay productive, he often attempted to sleep just a few hours per night.

But is it actually true that sleeping less than eight hours per night leads to more? More success, more productivity, more wealth? It’s really not that simple, nor healthy. “In the last 10 or 15 years or so, there have been studies showing that your metabolism and your immune system are quite affected by sleep deprivation,” sleep loss researcher Siobhan Banks from the University of South Australia tells Science Alert.

Source: The Science of a Good Nap

This library lets you borrow people instead of books. It just may help bridge our bitter divisions – CNN

By John Blake, CNN, Updated 7:14 AM ET, Sun November 14, 2021

Two women — one Muslim, one not — talk at a Human Library event in London in 2018.

(CNN)On a rainy spring morning in Muncie, Indiana, a White, middle-aged, conservative woman met a transgender woman for a date.

It did not start well. The transgender woman was waiting at a table when the other woman showed up. She stood up and extended her hand. The other woman refused to take it.

“I want you to know I’m a conservative Christian,” she said, still standing. “I’m a liberal Christian,” the transgender woman replied. “Let’s talk.”

Their rendezvous was supposed to last about 30 minutes. But the conversation was so engrossing for both that it lasted an hour.

It ended with the conservative woman rising from her seat to give the other woman a hug.”Thank you,” she said. “This has been wonderful.”

This improbable meeting came courtesy of the Human Library, a nonprofit learning platform that allows people to borrow people instead of books. But not just any people. Every “human book” from this library represents a group that faces prejudice or stigmas because of their lifestyle, ethnicity, beliefs, or disability. A human book can be an alcoholic, for example, or a Muslim, or a homeless person, or someone who was sexually abused.The Human Library stages in-person and online events where “difficult questions are expected, appreciated, and answered.” Organizers says they’re trying to encourage people to “unjudge” a book by its cover.

Source: This library lets you borrow people instead of books. It just may help bridge our bitter divisions – CNN

What is the perfect bed time? New study reveals best time for sleep – Deseret News

Falling asleep at a specific time might protect you from heart problems

By Herb Scribner @HerbScribner Nov 12, 2021, 11:00pm MST

Falling asleep at a specific time might protect you from heart problems
Illustration by Alex Cochran, Deseret News

Scientists may have identified the perfect bedtime to protect your heart — 10 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Per NBC News, scientists recently reviewed data from 88,000 adults who tracked their sleep patterns for six years.

They found that there was a 12% greater risk for heart disease in those who went to sleep from 11 p.m. to 11:59 p.m. There was a 25% higher risk of developing the cardiovascular disease for those who fell asleep past midnight. There was a 24% decreased risk in those who fell asleep before 10 p.m.

Source: What is the perfect bed time? New study reveals best time for sleep – Deseret News

Unvaccinated Adults 11 Times More Likely to Die from Covid-19: CDC – Rolling Stone

Hint: A lot more likely

By Peter Wade

A visitor sits on a bench to look artist Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg’s “In America: Remember,” a temporary art installation made up of white flags to commemorate Americans who have died of Covid-19, on the National Mall, in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, October 2nd, 2021.
AP

Getting vaccinated can significantly reduce your chances of dying from Covid-19.

Like, really significantly. Throughout the month of August, unvaccinated adults were 11 times more likely to die from Covid-19 than fully vaccinated adults, according to new data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC also found that unvaccinated adults faced a six times as likely to contract the virus than fully vaccinated adults. The data marks the first time the CDC has released information about how Covid-19 risks can differ depending on vaccination status.

Source: Unvaccinated Adults 11 Times More Likely to Die from Covid-19: CDC – Rolling Stone

Weight Gain And Obesity Up In 2020 In The U.S. : Shots – Health News : NPR

By Yuki Noguchi, September 29, 20211:01 PM ET

A Planet Fitness employee cleans equipment before a gym’s reopening in March in Inglewood, Calif., after being closed due to COVID-19. Reduced access to recreation likely has contributed to weight gain during the pandemic.
Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

It is official: The pandemic’s effect on America’s waistline has been rough.

New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed 16 states now have obesity rates of 35% or higher. That’s an increase of four states — Delaware, Iowa, Ohio and Texas — in just a year.

The findings confirm what several recent research studies have found: Many Americans have gained significant weight since the COVID-19 crisis started, likely fueled by an increase in sedentary behavior, stress and troubles such as job and income loss that make healthy eating harder. And those rates are rising faster among racial minorities.

Source: Weight Gain And Obesity Up In 2020 In The U.S. : Shots – Health News : NPR