Star Trek has truly reinvented itself – Polygon

The sci-fi franchise is all TV these days, and there’s something for (almost) everyone

By Dylan Roth, Sep 27, 2022, 10:40am EDT, 105 Comments / 105 New

Photo: Marni Grossman/Paramount Plus

Here’s a wild statistic: There are nearly as many currently running Star Trek television series as there are completed Star Trek television series. The first 40 years of the franchise’s history include five live-action series and one animated spinoff, totaling 725 episodes.

In the past five years, five new series have launched (six if you count Short Treks as its own entity), airing a cumulative 130 episodes as of today. Star Trek as a brand is busier than it’s been since the mid-1990s, when Deep Space Nine, Voyager, and the Next Generation TV series were all running concurrently and shops around the world dedicated entire displays to Star Trek toys, novels, and video games.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: https://www.polygon.com/23345284/star-trek-tv-show-best-start

How Different American Generations Spend Money, Visualized | Digg

Here’s how Americans’ yearly budgets change when broken down by generation.

By Adwait · 2 days ago · 24.4k reads

From article…

Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Preethi Lodha mapped out how each generation of Americans spend their money, on average.

Key Takeaways

Last year the average American spent around $60,000. The average member of Gen Z spent the least ($41,636) and the average Gen X-er spent the most ($83,357).

All the generations have one thing in common: they’ve all spent more than 30 percent of their annual spend on housing, whereas no generation has spent more than six percent of its annual spend on entertainment.

Source: https://digg.com/money/link/how-american-generations-spend-money-visualized-2rrDpS6vpM

The 100 Greatest TV Shows of All Time – Rolling Stone

A ranking of the most game-changing, side-splitting, tear-jerking, mind-blowing, world-building, genre-busting programs in television history, from the medium’s inception in the early 20th century through the ever-metastasizing era of Peak TV

By Alan Sepinwall, September 26, 2022

Illustration by Selman Hoşgör for Rolling Stone

How do you identify the very best series in a medium that’s been commercially available since the end of World War II?

Especially when that medium has experienced more radical change in the nine years between the finales of Breaking Bad and its prequel, Better Call Saul, than it did in the 60-odd years separating Walter White from Milton Berle?

The current Peak TV era is delivering us 500-plus scripted shows per year, many of them breaking boundaries in terms of how stories are told and who’s doing the telling. So, we decided to update our list of television’s all-time best offerings, originally compiled in 2016. Once again, we reached out to TV stars, creators, and critics — from multihyphenates like Natasha Lyonne, Ben Stiller, and Pamela Adlon to actors like Jon Hamm and Lizzy Caplan as well as the minds behind shows like The X-Files, Party Down, and Jane the Virgin — to sort through television’s vast and complicated history.

(See the full list of voters here.) Giving no restrictions on era or genre, we ended up with an eclectic list where the wholesome children’s television institution Sesame Street finished one spot ahead of foulmouthed Western Deadwood, while Eisenhower-era juggernaut I Love Lucy wound up sandwiched in between two shows, Lost and Arrested Development, that debuted during George W. Bush’s first term. Many favorites returned, and the top show retained its crown.

But voters couldn’t resist many standouts of the past few years, including a tragicomedy with a guinea-pig-themed café, an unpredictable comedy set in the world of hip-hop, and a racially charged adaptation of an unadaptable comic book. It’s a hell of a list.

Source: https://www.rollingstone.com/tv-movies/tv-movie-lists/best-tv-shows-of-all-time-1234598313/

What’s the Best Country to Retire? Not the U.S., Survey Says | Money

Why the U.S. Slipped Even Further Down the List of Best Countries for Retirement

By Author: Martha C. White, Editor: Jill Cornfield, Published: Sep 19, 2022, 6 min read

Bergen, Norway
Shutterstock

If you’re looking for the best place to retire, you might want to break out the atlas: The United States slipped even further down the list in a new ranking.

Four-decade-high inflation, a volatile stock market and ballooning public debt are among the factors threatening the economic security of retirees, according to the 2022 Natixis Investment Managers Global Retirement Index. The index evaluates 18 metrics grouped into four categories: health, finances in retirement, quality of life and material well-being.

What’s the best place to retire?

Norway climbed up from No. 3 to claim the top spot in the analysis of 44 developed economies, although the Scandinavian country is no stranger to the top of this list: When the index was first published in 2012, Norway topped it back then, too. Switzerland retained its second-place spot from 2021, and Iceland rounded out the top three.

Source: https://money.com/best-country-retire-not-united-states/

How libraries became refuges for people with mental illness.

By Anthony Aycock, Sept 22, 20225:50 AM

Photo illustration by Natalie Matthews-Ramo/Slate. Photo by Chanvre Québec on Unsplash and Pawel_B/iStock/Getty Images Plus.

Welcome to State of Mind, a new section from Slate and Arizona State University dedicated to exploring mental health. Follow us on Twitter.

The Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges is often credited with saying that “Paradise is a library.” He must not have meant a downtown public library, circa 8 p.m. Such places, like most communal spheres, can be a challenge to oversee.

Some people treat them like a sort of roomless hotel, sleeping in chairs and bathing in restrooms. I used to watch a man who looked like the famous woodcut of Blackbeard the Pirate ride the escalator of my three-story library up, down, up, down. For hours. Carrying a duffel bag. He never bothered anyone, so our security officers left him alone. (Can’t say the same for the lady of the evening who was meeting clients in the stairwell.)

Then there are the questions from believers in Qanon. Election deniers. Sovereign citizens. The woman who ranted about the “news” that the World Health Organization was going to “force a vote to allow them to take over the U.S. and force a lockdown like China.” (If WHO had that kind of power, why bother with a vote?)

The man who asked me how he and a few of his buddies could get into the governor’s office to “remove him” over pandemic closures. (Would that all insurrectionists did such thorough research!) Declinism is the feeling that everything is getting harder, scarier, and weirder, and a lot of people seem to have it.

Work in a library, I want to tell them, and you’ll learn what weird is.

Source: https://slate.com/technology/2022/09/libraries-mental-health-support.html