Love “Game of Thrones?” Thank “unfashionable” Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, who went against the grain and conquered pop culture – Salon.com

The Inklings were different. They clung by their fingernails to the past, to old languages and old books and old-school habits and values. They could be cranky geezers — beer drinkers who wore tweed, refused to admit women to their ranks and recited Anglo-Saxon poetry for fun. They expected to be ever-more marginalized and sneered at, although they did fight like hell to keep Oxford from updating its syllabus to included such new-fangled entertainments as Victorian novels. Still, they assumed that they’d lose eventually. They were so unfashionable! So how did they end up taking over popular culture?

via Love “Game of Thrones?” Thank “unfashionable” Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, who went against the grain and conquered pop culture – Salon.com.

English: Picture of the corner of the Eagle an...
English: Picture of the corner of the Eagle and Child pub, en Oxford (England), where the Inklings met (1930-1950). Español: Fotografía de la esquina del pub Eagle and Child en Oxford (Inglaterra), donde los Inklings se reunían (1930-1950). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Shadow of the Wind – One Book One San Diego 2015 – Resource Guides at San Diego Public Library

The Shadow of the Wind – One Book One San Diego 2015 – Resource Guides at San Diego Public Library.

This is the new 2015 One Book, One San Diego guide from our San Diego Public Library.

 

The Untold Story of ILM, a Titan That Forever Changed Film | WIRED

No one wanted Star Wars when George Lucas started shopping it to studios in the mid-1970s. It was the era of Taxi Driver and Network and Serpico; Hollywood was hot for authenticity and edgy drama, not popcorn space epics. But that was only part of the problem.

via The Untold Story of ILM, a Titan That Forever Changed Film | WIRED.


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Why can’t we read anymore? — Medium

Last year, I read four books.

The reasons for that low number are, I guess, the same as your reasons for reading fewer books than you think you should have read last year: I’ve been finding it harder and harder to concentrate on words, sentences, paragraphs. Let alone chapters. Chapters often have page after page of paragraphs. It just seems such an awful lot of words to concentrate on, on their own, without something else happening. And once you’ve finished one chapter, you have to get through another one. And usually a whole bunch more, before you can say finished, and get to the next. The next book. The next thing. The next possibility. Next next next.

via Why can’t we read anymore? — Medium.


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