Stephen King: on alcoholism and returning to the Shining

 Stephen King: 'I have no wish to shut the door on the past. I have been pretty upfront about my past. But do I regret? I do. I do.' Photograph: Steve Schofield for the Guardian Steve Schofield/Guardian
Stephen King: ‘I have no wish to shut the door on the past. I have been pretty upfront about my past. But do I regret? I do. I do.’ Photograph: Steve Schofield for the Guardian Steve Schofield/Guardian

Stephen King has written a lot of books – at 56 novels, he’s closing in on Agatha Christie – some of which have been great, some of which less so. Still, he says, when people say, “Steve, your books are uneven”, he’s confident “there’s good stuff in all of ’em”. Now and then, a story lingers in his mind long after it’s published. When fans ask what happened to Charlie McGee in Firestarter, for example, King isn’t interested. But when they ask what happened to Danny Torrance, the boy from The Shining, he always found himself wondering. Specifically: what the story would have looked like if Danny’s father – mad “white-knuckle alcoholic” Jack Torrance – had “found AA. And I thought, well, let’s find out.”

Source: Stephen King: on alcoholism and returning to the Shining

After Attacks, the Soul of Paris Endures – The New York Times

People lighting candles at the Place de la République in Paris. Credit Laurent Cipriani/Associated Press
People lighting candles at the Place de la République in Paris. Credit Laurent Cipriani/Associated Press

Seven essays by Americans — expats, travelers and writers — trying to take the long view of Paris and pick up the pieces after the Nov. 13 attacks.

Source: After Attacks, the Soul of Paris Endures – The New York Times

Stinks, Bangs and Booms: The Rise and Fall of the Chemistry Set

Learn about the evolution of the chemistry set throughout history, from the Young Chemists Pocket Companion in 1797 to modern kits.

Source: Stinks, Bangs and Booms: The Rise and Fall of the Chemistry Set

Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving to all…

The Modern Invention of Thanksgiving | JSTOR Daily

When you think of the history of Thanksgiving, you’d be hard-pressed not to picture funny Pilgrim hats and stereotyped Native Americans. These days, most of us know that the sanitized story we learned in grade school bears little resemblance to the real history of the Plymouth colony. But it might still come as a surprise to hear that, as Anne Blue Wills argues in a 2003 article in Church History, Thanksgiving as we know it was deliberately invented in the 19th Century.

Source: The Modern Invention of Thanksgiving | JSTOR Daily