Tag Archives: Research

Want to Raise Successful Kids? Science Says These 5 Habits Matter, Bigtime | Inc.com

The science suggests that if you want to do right by your kids, you should probably do these things.

By Bill Murphy Jr., http://www.billmurphyjr.com @BillMurphyJr, July 4, 2022

Photo: Getty Images

There comes a time in some people’s lives when their aspirations for their children begin to rival or even exceed their aspirations for themselves.

It’s happened to me since I’ve become a parent myself. As a result, I’ve been on a years-long mission to collect as much science-based advice as possible regarding how to raise successful kids.

Here are five of the most interesting and useful strategies I’ve found and highlighted recently. The science suggests that if you want to do right by your kids, you should probably do these things.

1. Make them do chores.
Researchers at La Trobe University in Australia recently set out to determine whether children who do chores at home would develop better working memory, inhibition, and other success-predicting behaviors.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: Want to Raise Successful Kids? Science Says These 5 Habits Matter, Bigtime | Inc.com

Are News Librarians Making a Comeback? The Past, Present, and Possible Future of News Librarians | Information Today | Online Searcher

By Robert Berkman, Volume 46, Number 3 – May/June 2022

red framed eyeglasses on newspapers
Photo by Suzy Hazelwood on Pexels.com

As many information professionals know, the position of news librarian (as well as news researcher) was once quite common inside media organizations.

Journalists relied on news librarians as critical partners for carrying out the higher mission of their jobs—that is, to expose sources of unaccountable power, provide the public with information it needs to know, and further citizens’ ability to participate in a democracy.

Thus, news researchers played a particularly important role in society. So important—and sometimes so exciting—that news librarians have been portrayed in Hollywood movies, including in the role of hero.

Some of these films, such as the 1957 Desk Set, were fictional. In this film, Katherine Hepburn stars as head librarian Bunny Watson at the New York City-based Federal Broadcasting Network. At her job, Bunny heroically takes on efficiency expert Richard Sumner (Spencer Tracy) whom, it is feared, plans to replace the librarians with EMERAC, a massive computer, or “electronic brain,” that could quickly spit out answers to whatever question it was asked.

In one scene, Bunny assures the research librarians: “They can’t build a machine to do our job— there are too many cross-references!” (script-o-rama.com/movie_scripts/d/desk-set-script-transcript-hepburn.html).

Fictional news librarians weren’t the only ones hailed as movie heroes. The Oscar-winning 2015 film Spotlight examines how real-life Boston Globe news librarian Lisa Tuite (Michele Proude) performed a vital role as part of the team working with investigative reporters Mike Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo) and Walter “Robby” Robinson (Michael Keaton).

The reporters relied on Tuite to help them track down the names of area priests reassigned from one parish to another after being accused of sexual abuse. Spotlight shows how Tuite first had to find an actual source that included names of local priests (a print directory!); identify the key terms used in the directory to designate when a priest was sent from one parish to another; and then, along with the reporters, figure out which terms offered clues that a priest was sent away because of suspected abuse. She cross-referenced(!) those names with a second directory to find priests who were potential abusers and passed those names to the reporters.

Tuite’s research was critical to the actual reporters’ investigation, which resulted in the Globe’s famous 2002 exposé series.

More recently, a news librarian’s critical work was again highlighted—not in a movie but in a book— Perversion of Justice: The Jeffrey Epstein Story, by Miami Herald investigative reporter Julie K. Brown. In it, she praises Monika Leal, information services director at the Herald, and tells how they worked together identifying Epstein’s victims and other details in the investigation.

Sadly, though, during the last 20 years, the real-life stories for the vast majority of news librarians have been anything but glamorous. Beginning in the early 2000s, a growing number of media companies began laying off their library and research staff; many even shuttered their libraries completely. By 2015, the number of practicing news librarians had shrunk so low that SLA dissolved its news librarian division. The position of news librarian was becoming nearly extinct.

–from article…

Is there now an increased demand for news librarians? If so, why? Who is hiring? What might a news librarian’s roles and responsibilities be in 2022 and moving forward?

Are News Librarians Making a Comeback? The Past, Present, and Possible Future of News Librarians

Baby Boomers more likely to have multiple health issues than earlier generations | StudyFinds

By John Anderer, June 14, 2022

(© bernardbodo – stock.adobe.com)

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Baby boomers are more likely to live with numerous chronic health conditions than earlier generations, according to new research from Penn State and Texas State University.

Study authors warn that the growing rate of multiple chronic health conditions (multimorbidity) among older Americans represents a real health threat to the nation.

If it continues, this trend will almost certainly place increased strain on the well-being of older adults, medical infrastructures, and federal insurance systems.

On a related note, the amount of Americans over 65 is projected to increase by an astounding 50 percent by 2050.

Source: Baby Boomers more likely to have multiple health issues than earlier generations – Study Finds

NASA creates team to study UFOs – CNN

By Katie Hunt and Ashley Strickland, CNN, Updated 3:20 PM ET, Thu June 9, 2022

from article…

(CNN) NASA is putting a team together to study unidentified aerial phenomena, popularly known as UFOs, the US space agency said Thursday.

The team will gather data on “events in the sky that cannot be identified as aircraft or known natural phenomena — from a scientific perspective,” the agency said.

Key lawmaker warns at UFO hearing: ‘Unidentified aerial phenomena are a potential national security threat’ Key lawmaker warns at UFO hearing: ‘Unidentified aerial phenomena are a potential national security threat’

NASA said it was interested in UAPs from a security and safety perspective. There was no evidence UAPs are extraterrestrial in origin, NASA added. The study will begin this fall and is expected to take nine months.

“NASA believes that the tools of scientific discovery are powerful and apply here also,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, the associate administrator of the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC.

Source: NASA creates team to study UFOs – CNN

The Russian Invasion of Ukraine: Resources at the Library of Congress | Library of Congress Blog

March 3, 2022 by Neely Tucker

This 1648 map is one of the first to use “Ukraine” as the name for the region. Geography and Map Division.

The Russian invasion of Ukraine is the latest violent development in a long and turbulent history in the land of the steppes, and the Library has international resources on the region that go back for hundreds of years.

You can learn a lot here, from one of the first maps that used the name “Ukraine” for the area (in 1648), to the poetry and writings of national hero Taras Shevchenko in the 19th century, to up-to-the-minute news and analysis from the Congressional Research Service.

You can also watch an hourlong seminar, Putin, Ukraine, and What’s Likely to Happen, hosted by the Library’s Kluge Institute and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, recorded just before Russia invaded.

This article is a brief summary of the Library’s holdings regarding the region.

Shevchenko statue in Washington, D.C. Photo: Carol Highsmith. Prints and Photographs Division.

Some descriptions are from official Library documents.

First, it helps to know that Ukraine roughly translates as “frontier” and its location between Europe and Asia has meant that human beings have traipsed through it, going east or west, for thousands of years. It has been included in any number of empires, divided into many different configurations and called by any number of names before it declared independence in its current boundaries in 1991, after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Our primary documents thus refer to the region by the name (or names) it was known at the time. The maps, lithographs, books and manuscripts shine through with illuminations and hand-coloring from centuries long past.

Source: The Russian Invasion of Ukraine: Resources at the Library of Congress | Library of Congress Blog