Tag Archives: Library of Congress

Library of Congress Book Festival | 2021

Posted by DrWeb, Festival is Sept. 17-26, see below for more information and links…

https://www.loc.gov/events/2021-nathttps://www.loc.gov/events/2021-national-book-festival/ional-book-festival/

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From the National Recording Registry: Remembering Don Everly | Now See Hear! | library of congress

From August 25, 2021, by Stacie Seifrit-Griffin

Celebrating Don Everly’s 81st Birthday in Nashville (2018) (left to right) Adelaidia Garza, Michelle Phillips, Stacie Seifrit-Griffin, Don Everly and Adela Everly.

An Evening with Don Everly,
February 1, 1937 – August 21, 2021

It is truly the end of an era with the passing of the talented, charming and iconic Don Everly. The influence The Everly Brothers have had on so many musicians and genres of music is immeasurable.

Don and his brother, Phil, are credited with two songs in the Library of Congress National Recording Registry; “Cathy’s Clown“ inducted in 2013, and their contribution to Paul Simon’s “Graceland” inducted in 2006.

I met Don Everly through Michelle Phillips of The Mamas & the Papas. In addition to being my closest friend and confidant for over 30 years, Michelle was a bridesmaid in my wedding, and we celebrate important milestones in our lives including new jobs, break-ups, my bridal shower, baby showers and many birthday celebrations.

Early in our friendship, we discovered our shared love of travel. We make it a point to schedule at least one trip a year, and during these adventures, it is not uncommon for Michelle to call an “old friend” who happens to live in our destination city. You never know who you will meet when hanging out with Mama Michelle.

Source: From the National Recording Registry: Remembering Don Everly | Now See Hear!

Summer Beauties: The Golden Age of Travel Posters | Library of Congress Blog

August 19, 2021 by Neely Tucker

This Depression-era Works Progress Administration Federal Art Project poster urged Americans to travel. Artist: Alexander Dux. Prints and Photographs Division.

Jan Grenci, a reference specialist in the Prints & Photographs Division, wrote a short piece about travel posters in the July/August issue of the Library of Congress Magazine.

It’s been expanded here. Some of the Library’s most popular Free to Use and Reuse photographs and prints are the travel posters from the golden age of the art form, the 1920s to the 1960s, when artists used graphic design, bold lines and deep colors to render destinations more as a mood than just a place.

Take, for example, that image above. The massive scale of the stalagmites and stalactites, the huge cavern opening — they combine to dwarf the man and woman in the foreground. The blueish/purple geologic formations, lit softly from the right, are offset by the shadows in deep black. She appears to be dressed in a skirt, blouse and (one hopes) sensible walking shoes; he, his hat at a jaunty angle, is clad in a coat, jodhpurs and riding boots, complete with a gentleman’s walking stick. They appear not just to be enjoying a day’s hike so much as contemplating the immense passage of time itself.

Source: Summer Beauties: The Golden Age of Travel Posters | Library of Congress Blog

On the Film Registry: “National Lampoon’s Animal House” (1978): An Interview with Tim Matheson | Now See Hear! | library of congress

August 2, 2021 by Stacie Seifrit-Griffin

 Animal House still, courtesy of Tim Matheson

It was 20 years ago that the Library of Congress added “National Lampoon’s Animal House” to the National Film Registry.

Originally released in 1978 and inducted in 2001, “Animal House” remains one of the most quoted and iconic comedy films in history.

In his book, “America’s Film Legacy: The Authoritative Guide To The Landmark Movies In The National Film Registry,” author Daniel Eagan says “National Lampoon’s Animal House” has become one of the most influential comedies of the 1970’s.

Embraced by younger viewers, it has been used as a blueprint by a succeeding generation of comedy filmmakers.”

Source: On the Film Registry: “National Lampoon’s Animal House” (1978): An Interview with Tim Matheson | Now See Hear!

America on the Road: The Family Vacation by Car | Library of Congress Blog

July 26, 2021 by Neely Tucker

Alaska postcard in the 1950 travel journal of sociologist Rilma Oxley Buckman. Manuscript Division.

This is a guest post by Joshua Levy, a historian in the Manuscript Division.

In 1960, John Steinbeck set out on a months-long road trip to reacquaint himself with his country. He returned not with clear answers but with his head a “barrel of worms.”

The America he saw was too intertwined with how he felt in the moment, and with his own Americanness, to permit an objective account of the journey. “External reality,” he wrote, “has a way of being not so external after all.”

Pandemics aren’t the only reason Americans have found sanctuary in our homes, or the only anxious times we’ve itched to escape them. The American road trip was first popularized during the auto camping craze of the 1920s, with its devotion to freedom and communing with nature, but it was democratized after World War II.

The golden age of the American family vacation came during the very height of the Cold War. It was a time when, according to historian Susan Rugh, the family car became a “home on the road… a cocoon of domestic space” in which families could feel safe to explore their country.

Source: America on the Road: The Family Vacation by Car | Library of Congress Blog

“A step out of and beyond nature”: Picturing the Moon | Picture This: Library of Congress Prints & Photos

July 22, 2021 by Barbara Orbach Natanson

The following is a guest post by Micah Messenheimer, Curator of Photography, Prints & Photographs Division.

Phase of the moon taken March 1851. Photo by John Adams Whipple, 1851 March, printed 1853. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.22196

This week’s anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing provides a perfect opportunity to explore our holdings of lunar photography in the Prints & Photographs Division.

From the medium’s beginnings, the moon fascinated photographers as both a subject of scientific inquiry and as poetic muse. Early efforts to photograph the moon were often met with failure due to the low sensitivity of available materials.

Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre attempted photographs in his eponymous process around 1838 that were described as “fuzzy and low in details,” by his advocate, François Arago. Successful photographs of the moon using the daguerreotype process would not be made until over a dozen years later, when the celebrated Boston portrait photographer John Adams Whipple sought the assistance of Harvard astronomer William Cranch Bond and his son, George Phillips Bond.

Using the college observatory’s Great Refractor telescope, they captured the sphere in its waxing gibbous phase on March 14, 1851.

Source: “A step out of and beyond nature”: Picturing the Moon | Picture This: Library of Congress Prints & Photos