Tag Archives: Pandemic

A Year In, Here’s What We Know About Vitamin D For Preventing COVID

April 14, 2021, 3:17 PM ET, Will Stone

Some researchers are optimistic that vitamin D supplements may prove helpful in preventing COVID-19. Others are skeptical.
Michele Abercrombie/NPR

When the pandemic hit, many Americans turned to vitamins and supplements in hopes of boosting their immune systems.

Scientists also raced to study them. Vitamin D, perhaps more than any other, captured the attention of researchers.

Even the nation’s top infectious disease doctor, Anthony Fauci, embraced the idea of using the vitamin to help keep COVID-19 at bay, saying in September that he takes a supplement to avoid being deficient and “would not mind recommending” it to others.

Source: A Year In, Here’s What We Know About Vitamin D For Preventing COVID

Brain fog: how trauma, uncertainty and isolation have affected our minds and memory | Health & wellbeing | The Guardian

After a year of lockdown, many of us are finding it hard to think clearly, or remember what happened when. Neuroscientists and behavioural experts explain why

‘There isn’t something wrong with us. It’s a completely normal reaction.’ Illustration: Franz Lang/Franz Lang at Heart/ The Guardian

Moya Sarner, Wed 14 Apr 2021 01.00 EDT

Before the pandemic, psychoanalyst Josh Cohen’s patients might come into his consulting room, lie down on the couch and talk about the traffic or the weather, or the rude person on the tube. Now they appear on his computer screen and tell him about brain fog. They talk with urgency of feeling unable to concentrate in meetings, to read, to follow intricately plotted television programmes.

“There’s this sense of debilitation, of losing ordinary facility with everyday life; a forgetfulness and a kind of deskilling,” says Cohen, author of the self-help book How to Live. What to Do. Although restrictions are now easing across the UK, with greater freedom to circulate and socialise, he says lockdown for many of us has been “a contraction of life, and an almost parallel contraction of mental capacity”.

This dulled, useless state of mind – epitomised by the act of going into a room and then forgetting why we are there – is so boring, so lifeless.

But researchers believe it is far more interesting than it feels: even that this common experience can be explained by cutting-edge neuroscience theories, and that studying it could further scientific understanding of the brain and how it changes. I ask Jon Simons, professor of cognitive neuroscience at the University of Cambridge, could it really be something “sciencey”?

“Yes, it’s definitely something sciencey – and it’s helpful to understand that this feeling isn’t unusual or weird,” he says. “There isn’t something wrong with us. It’s a completely normal reaction to this quite traumatic experience we’ve collectively had over the last 12 months or so.”

–Jon Simons, professor of cognitive neuroscience at the University of Cambridge

Source: Brain fog: how trauma, uncertainty and isolation have affected our minds and memory | Health & wellbeing | The Guardian

Las Vegas set to come out of Covid-19 better than ever | CNN Travel

Matt Villano, CNN • Published 14th April 2021

Virgin Hotels Las Vegas opened this March.
Courtesy Virgin Hotels

(CNN) — More than a year into the Covid-19 pandemic, this desert city is looking bigger, bolder and better than ever.

New casino resorts, innovative restaurants, expanded convention space and one-of-a-kind cultural destinations characterize the latest iteration of Las Vegas, which continues to reinvent itself in the face of adversity.

Heck, Elon Musk even built an underground tunnel and transport system that’s opening soon.

Featured image caption: The pool at Circa Resort & Casino is called Stadium Swim. Rum Tongue Media/Courtesy Circa Resort & Casino

Source: Las Vegas set to come out of Covid-19 better than ever | CNN Travel

What Is Hospitality? The Current Answer Doesn’t Work. – The New York Times

The host-guest relationship puts all the onus on the server, particularly during the pandemic, and points to the dysfunction at the heart of the business.

Great hospitality is hard to describe, but it surrounds you. Here, a server in Washington D.C., in 1949, gave a diner time to decide on her order.Credit…Rae Russel/Getty Images

One of my last restaurant meals before the shutdowns started last year was at Swan Oyster Depot in San Francisco.

I waited on the street by a fishy-smelling puddle until I was waved toward a seat at the well-worn counter.

Crushed between two strangers on a wobbly stool, I happily ate as much fresh, sweet, cold Dungeness crab meat as I could.

Happily, because the server across the bar was making me feel comfortable and cared for, safe and unhurried, though I can’t say exactly how he did this.

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/13/dining/restaurant-hospitality.html

Six ways to stay balanced during the climate crisis – The Washington Post

Palm trees frame a home being destroyed by the Woolsey wildfire above the Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu, Calif, on Nov. 9, 2018. (Reed Saxon/AP)

By Ariella Cook-Shonkoff and Neelu Tummala, April 7, 2021 at 1:12 p.m. PDT

As vaccine rollouts allow us to plan for a post-pandemic world, we face another looming emergency: the climate crisis.

While pandemic pall is visceral, climate change can feel far off, requiring effort to remain engaged, or at a minimum, to keep paying attention.

But with our future dependent on climate action over the next nine years, it’s urgent that we zoom out of our siloed lives and step into the broader panorama. The climate crisis demands our attention.

As bicoastal medical and mental health practitioners, we are deeply concerned about the adverse health consequences of global warming, including: increased risk of heart disease and stroke, higher rates of violence, the widening spread of infectious diseases as well as the psychological toll.

Source: Six ways to stay balanced during the climate crisis – The Washington Post