Tag Archives: Writing

That Time of Year: Chapter One | Garrison Keillor

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It’s been an easy life and when I think back, I wish it were a summer morning after a rain and I were loading my bags into the luggage hold of the bus and climbing aboard past Al, the driver, and the bench seats up front to the bunks in back and claiming a low bunk in the rear for myself.

We’re about to set off on a twenty-eight-city tour of one-­nighters, two buses, the staff bus and the talent bus (though actually the tech guys, Sam and Thomas and Albert and Tony, have most of the talent and the rest of us just do the best we can). I kiss Jenny goodbye and she envies me, having been on opera and orchestra bus tours herself and loved them.

The show band guys sit in front, Rich Dworsky, Chris, Pat and Pete, Andy, Gary or Larry, Richard, Joe, Arnie the drummer, Heather the duet partner on “Under African Skies” and “In My Life” and Greg Brown’s “Early.”

Fred Newman is here, Mr. Sound Effects, and we’ll do the Bebopareebop commercial about the meteorite flying into Earth’s atmosphere about to wipe out an entire city when a beluga in heat sings a note that sets off a nuclear missile that deflects the meteorite to the Mojave Desert where it cracks the earth’s crust and hatches prehistoric eggs of pterodactyls, which rise screeching and galumphing toward a tiny town and a Boy Scout camp where a lone bagpiper plays the Lost Chord that pulverizes the pterodactyls’ tiny brains and sends them crashing and gibbering into an arroyo, and I say, “Wouldn’t this be a good time for a piece of rhubarb pie?” and we sing, One little thing can revive a guy, and that is a piece of rhubarb pie. Serve it up nice and hot, maybe things aren’t as bad as you thought.

Source: That Time of Year: Chapter One | Garrison Keillor

Paris Review – The Art of Fiction No. 16

Interviewed by Richard H. Goldstone

Issue 15, Winter 1956

Sketch by Rosalie Seidler, 1956.

A national newsmagazine not very long ago in its weekly cover story limned Thornton Wilder as an amiable, eccentric itinerant schoolmaster who wrote occasional novels and plays, which won prizes and enjoyed enormous but somewhat unaccountable success.

Wilder himself has said, “I’m almost sixty and look it. I’m the kind of man whom timid old ladies stop on the street to ask about the nearest subway station: newsvendors in university towns call me ‘professor,’ and hotel clerks, ‘doctor’.”

Many of those who have viewed him in the classroom, on the speaker’s rostrum, on shipboard, or at gatherings, have been reminded of Theodore Roosevelt who was at the top of his form when Wilder was an adolescent, and whom Wilder resembles in his driving energy, his enthusiasms, and his unbounded gregariousness.

Source: Paris Review – The Art of Fiction No. 16

An Introduction to The Solarpunk Genre | Book Riot

By Emily Wenstrom, Mar 23, 2021

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While a great deal of science fiction involves gloom, doom, and cynicism about humanity’s fate (Apocalypse! Dystopia! Grimdark!), there are bright spots of optimism within the genre.

Meet solarpunk.What Is Solarpunk?

The overall vibe of the solarpunk genre is often described as inspired by Art Nouveau, Victorian, and Afrofuturist motifs. Illustrations of solarpunk landscapes often look hypermodern, light, airy, and colorful, but can also be rich in elegant detail.

Most of all, everything is so, so green. Just covered in leaves. Like Ewoks moved into the Watergate. Along with this visual style, the spirit of solarpunk is one of craftsmanship, egalitarianism, and optimism where technology can be put to work to solve our greatest problems.

Editor’s Note: Includes mention of classic solarpunk novels, and some newer ones.

Source: An Introduction to The Solarpunk Genre | Book Riot

Hemingway’s history: Community boasts ties to author

  From left, Frances “Bunny” Thorne and Ernest Hemingway enjoy each other’s company while in Sheridan County. Courtesy photo | The Wyoming Room
From left, Frances “Bunny” Thorne and Ernest Hemingway enjoy each other’s company while in Sheridan County. Courtesy photo | The Wyoming Room

When describing places in the world where Ernest Hemingway is most known, fans and followers of the author may list Spain, Cuba, Key West and even Idaho.

Source: Hemingway’s history: Community boasts ties to author

Stacy Keach on Playing Hemingway | The Hemingway Society

Ernest Hemingway
Ernest Hemingway

“Stacy Keach joins the show to reflect on his legendary career, particularly his portrayal of Hemingway on the stage, in the classic miniseries, and in his audio recording of short stories.

“Keach compares the art of acting to the act of writing and gets to the heart of Hemingway’s knack for conveying emotion in spare prose.  He reflects on the many adaptations of Hemingway novels and his friendship with George C. Scott and John Huston.  He also offers insights into Hemingway’s psychology and destructive habits.

“As a special bonus, hear Keach’s brilliant read of our “one true sentence” introduction!

“This episode was recorded on 08/08/2019.”

Source: Stacy Keach on Playing Hemingway | The Hemingway Society