Category Archives: Film & Movies

Film & Movies

‘Science Needs Better Marketing’ Says Neil deGrasse Tyson – YouTube

From YouTube…

‘Science Needs Better Marketing’ Says Neil deGrasse Tyson

8,623 views • Dec 30, 2021

• Hayden Planetarium director and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson discusses with Nicolle Wallace the year in science and what lies ahead in the new year.

Source: ‘Science Needs Better Marketing’ Says Neil deGrasse Tyson – YouTube

“Return of the Jedi,” Mark Hamill and the 2021 National Film Registry | Library of Congress Blog

December 14, 2021 by Neely Tucker

Mark Hamill as Luke Skywalker in a scene from “Return of the Jedi.” Photo: Lucasfilm/Walt Disney Company.

Video of announcement: https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-10132/

The National Film Registry’s 2021 class is the most diverse in the program’s 33-year history, including blockbusters such as “Return of the Jedi,” “Selena” and “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring,” but also the ’70s midnight-movie favorite “Pink Flamingos” and a 1926 film featuring Black pilots in the daring new world of aviation, “The Flying Ace.”

The 2021 selections, announced today, include movies dating back nearly 120 years and represent the work of Hollywood studios, independent filmmakers, documentarians, women directors, filmmakers of color, students and the silent era.

Most pointedly, the inductees also include a trio of documentaries that addressed murderous violence against Blacks, Asians and Latinos, respectively, in “The Murder of Fred Hampton,” Who Killed Vincent Chin?” and “Requiem-29.”

Source: “Return of the Jedi,” Mark Hamill and the 2021 National Film Registry | Library of Congress Blog

Harry Potter reunion: First look at Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint | EW.com

The three Gryffindors are going back to school for Harry Potter 20th Anniversary: Return to Hogwarts.

Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, and Daniel Radcliffe on ‘Harry Potter 20th Anniversary: Return to Hogwarts’
| Credit: HBO Max

Three of Hogwarts’ most famous alums are heading back to the school’s hallowed halls for a 20th anniversary reunion, and we’ve finally got our first look at them together again.

HBO Max just released a photo of Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, and Rupert Grint — who famously played the intrepid young wizards Harry Potter, Hermione Granger, and Ron Weasley in the blockbuster Harry Potter film franchise — on the set of Harry Potter 20th Anniversary: Return to Hogwarts.

The photo finds the trio in good spirits, catching up in what appears to be the Gryffindor common room.

Streaming Jan. 1, the retrospective special will look back at the making of the eight Harry Potter movies via in-depth interviews and conversations with cast and crew.

It will arrive some two decades after the release of the first film, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, and about 10 years after the concluding installment, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 2.

Source: Harry Potter reunion: First look at Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint | EW.com

A Slice of American Life from the FSA/OWI Photograph Collection | Picture This: Library of Congress Prints & Photos | Library of Congress

November 18, 2021 by Kristi Finefield

Moreno Valley, Colfax County, New Mexico. Mary Mutz making an apple pie on the Mutz ranch. Photo by John Collier, Jr., 1943 Feb. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8d26282

Thanksgiving in America is pie’s time to shine, as one or more of these delightful desserts often provide the sweet finish to Thanksgiving feasts across the country.

Depending on where you live or your family hails from, the pies could contain pecan, sweet potato, pumpkin, apple, or a wide variety of other delicious fillings.

The Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information (FSA/OWI) collection includes photo stories in which the photographer captures a simple task of daily life, sometimes taking a series of photographs of the steps it takes to complete it.

Two photo series I found illustrate the everyday task of making a pie, offering visual insight into life in the 1930s and 1940s, and a chance to observe if anything has changed in the intervening decades. As I plot my pie plan for next week, I’ll share these two stories of pie making from the FSA/OWI collection below.

Mary Mutz of Moreno Valley, California puts together an apple pie through five photos, from filling the pie crust, adding the top crust, trimming and crimping it, sprinkling sugar on top and baking the pie. The negatives aren’t always numbered in order so it’s important to look closely when putting together the sequence, as seen below…

Source: A Slice of American Life from the FSA/OWI Photograph Collection | Picture This: Library of Congress Prints & Photos

CONTRARY BRIN: Dune the movie: Lynch vs Villeneuve vs Frank Herbert… and us.

By Contrary Brin, Wednesday, November 03, 2021

From article…

Dune the movie: Lynch vs Villeneuve vs Frank Herbert… and us.

All right, off-the-cuff let me say that, of course, the latest adaptation of Dune by Denis Villeneuve is magnificent. It is spectacularly good and supremely enjoyable, on a par with the best of Spielberg, or Zemeckis, or Cameron.

The admirable qualities are apparent to all. Still, even while enjoying great movies, there remains a part of me who keeps taking notes.

Furthermore, general approval doesn’t forbid my making a few specific comments, including comparisons to earlier versions. And so, for those of you who enjoy nitpickery – and promise you won’t let it spoil for you a great flick – buckle up and let’s get to it: SPOILERS

Source: CONTRARY BRIN: Dune the movie: Lynch vs Villeneuve vs Frank Herbert… and us.

The Enduring Appeal of “Dune” as an Adolescent Power Fantasy | The New Yorker

When you’re a teen-ager like Paul Atreides, it can seem like authority figures are always forcing you to do pointless, excruciating things.

By Ed Park, October 27, 2021

Denis Villeneuve’s adaptation of “Dune” stars Timothée Chalamet as Paul Atreides and Rebecca Ferguson as Lady Jessica Atreides.Photograph by Chiabella James

Pressed inside an old book of mine is a gray sheet of paper, folded in uneven quarters, titled “Dune Terminology.” On it, there are thirty-seven words and phrases, including a baffling array of place names (Giedi Prime, pronounced “Gee-dee”), machinery (ornithopter, a “small aircraft capable of sustained wing-beat flight in the manner of birds”), and rituals (kanly, a “formal feud or vendetta under the rules of the Great Convention”).

Moviegoers with tickets to David Lynch’s “Dune,” which premièred December 14, 1984—I saw it on opening weekend at a mall, in suburban Buffalo—would have picked up the glossary from a stack as they entered the theatre, though the guide was unreadable in the dark, and it contained more than a few spoilers. To the novice, it must have looked like homework. It must have looked like no fun at all.

Source: The Enduring Appeal of “Dune” as an Adolescent Power Fantasy | The New Yorker