Category Archives: Film & Movies

Film & Movies

William Shatner has traveled to space in Blue Origin rocket : NPR

By Joe Hernandez, Updated October 13, 202111:08 AM ET

Blue Origin’s New Shepard lifts off from the launch pad carrying 90-year-old Star Trek actor William Shatner and three other civilians near Van Horn, Texas.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Blue Origin’s second human spaceflight has returned to Earth after taking a brief flight to the edge of space this morning. Among the four passengers on board — there is no pilot — was William Shatner, the actor who first played the space-traveling Captain Kirk in the Star Trek franchise.

“The covering of blue. This sheet, this blanket, this comforter that we have around. We think, oh, that’s blue sky,” an emotional Shatner said after returning to earth.

Canadian actor William Shatner, who became a cultural icon for his portrayal of Captain James T. Kirk in the Star Trek franchise, speaks from the stage at the second edition of the multi-genre entertainment comic and fan convention ‘Comic Con Africa’ in Johannesburg on September 21, 2019.
MICHELE SPATARI/AFP via Getty Images

“Then suddenly you shoot through it all of the sudden, as though you’re whipping a sheet off you when you’re asleep, and you’re looking into blackness, into black ugliness.”

At age 90, Shatner is now the oldest person to fly into space.

Source: William Shatner has traveled to space in Blue Origin rocket : NPR

The Birth of BOND | Vanity Fair | October 2012

October 2012, By David Kamp

Screenshot from article…

Enter Sean Connery, dark hair slicked with pomade, eyes locking hungrily upon a beautiful green-eyed girl.

Her return glance leaves no doubt—the feeling is mutual. His slouch and casual banter exude languor and nonchalance, but there’s an undercurrent of coiled menace to this man, as though he might, at any moment, spring into table-overturning, crockery-shattering action.

Except nothing of the sort happens. Instead, the other fellow in the scene cuts the tension by taking out his fiddle and favoring the room with a jaunty tune learned, he says in a stagy brogue, “in the old ruins on the top of Knocknasheega!” This isn’t a James Bond picture.

It is 1959, and Connery is putting in time in a cornball live-action Disney feature called Darby O’Gill and the Little People. He’s the second male lead, billed beneath not only Albert Sharpe, the elderly Irish character actor in the title role—a kindly farmhand who sees leprechauns—but also the green-eyed girl, the ingenue Janet Munro. Though verily pump-misting pheromonal musk into the air, to a degree unmatched before or since by any actor in a Disney family movie, Connery is still a jobbing scuffler, not a star. He has no idea of what lies in store for him.

Source: The Birth of BOND | Vanity Fair | October 2012

Celebrating the Librarians of SFF | Tor.com

By Stubby the Rocket, Wed Sep 29, 2021 10:00am 32 comments 7 Favorites [+]

From article…

Across fantasy and science fiction (with the occasional stop in horror), there are any number of amazing fictional libraries we’d love to visit—especially to meet up with the guardians of the stacks!

After all, what’s a fantasy story without an awe-inspiring tower full of potentially curséd books?

Or a sci-fi adventure without the cumulative knowledge of civilization stored somewhere to guide our heroes on their quest?

We decided it was time for an overdue celebration of the keepers of knowledge, from experts in Egyptology to far-future book-lovers fighting tyrannical governments to sword-wielding barbarians, we have a librarian for every occasion.

Editor’s Note: Lots of listing in the article, and check out the comments as well.

Source: Celebrating the Librarians of SFF | Tor.com

Serendipity Turns 20: Director Talks Film Secrets, Shares Rare Photos | The Insider

By Jason Guerrasio, Oct 1, 2021, 6:21 AM

From YouTube, Official Trailer

“Serendipity” is one of those movies that was out in the world before people figured out how special it really was.

The film, a romantic comedy set in holiday-time New York City, starring John Cusack and Kate Beckinsale, followed two star-crossed strangers, Jonathan and Sara, who risked ruining their relationships to find one another again.

Kate Beckinsale and John Cusack at the “Serendipity” premiere in 2001.
J. Vespa/WireImage/Getty

On paper, it looked to be another early 2000s hit for studio head Harvey Weinstein and his thriving indie juggernaut Miramax Films.

But then the attacks of September 11, 2001, happened.

Suddenly, director Peter Chelsom — whose only real challenge during filming was figuring out a way to make his stars look like they were on wintery New York City streets during July — had a major issue on his hands.

Not only was the movie one of the first to open in theaters after the cataclysmic event, but weeks before it hit screens on October 5, Weinstein demanded that Chelsom erase the Twin Towers from a skyline shot in the movie.

Source: Serendipity Turns 20: Director Talks Film Secrets, Shares Rare Photos

Opening the Treasure Chest: National Silent Movie Day | Now See Hear! | Library of Congress

September 29, 2021 by Stacie Seifrit-Griffin

Mary Pickford, Library of Congress

Today we celebrate National Silent Movie Day by opening the treasure chest and sharing some of the resources that the Library of Congress offers to research and expand your interest in these classic and iconic motion pictures.

The American silent feature film era lasted from 1912 to 1929 with nearly 11,000 feature films produced, but sadly today, more than 70% are believed to be completely lost and gone forever.

The Library of Congress has the largest single collection of American silent feature films in the world, although many important titles are also held at other national institutions and universities.

Source: Opening the Treasure Chest: National Silent Movie Day | Now See Hear!

The Superstars Align for the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures’ Opening Gala | Vanity Fair

A set by Lady Gaga, toasts by Tom Hanks and Nicole Kidman, and more make for a night to remember in L.A

By Britt Hennemuth, Photography by Greg Williams, September 26, 2021

Lady Gaga, Photograph by Greg Williams / courtesy Academy Museum Foundation.

After nearly a decade of anticipation, the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures will open on Thursday, September 30, in Los Angeles.

To toast the occasion on Saturday night, a room of Covid-compliant Oscar winners, history-makers, and hopefuls took a trip down the green carpet, a right past Dorothy’s ruby slippers, and a left under a massive fiberglass shark from Jaws, before crossing over the Barbra Streisand bridge to the top floor of the Renzo Piano-designed glass dome for the Opening Night Gala.

Creative director Lisa Love and Artistic Director Raul Ávila transformed the 360 degree vista into a modern Cocoanut Grove complete with 30 palm trees, a band stand, and a fleet of horns.

The evening recalled the Golden Age of Hollywood, and included toasts by Tom Hanks, Laura Dern, Bob Iger, Annette Bening, Ava DuVernay, Nicole Kidman, and Ted Sarandos. Admission (seats sold for upwards of $50,000) raised money for the museum’s access, education, and programming initiatives, and honored the Ethiopian filmmaker Haile Gerima and Italian supernova Sophia Loren, with help from co-chairs DuVernay, Jason Blum, and Ryan Murphy.

The host committee included industry titans Spike Lee, Brian Lourd, Ralph Lauren, Barry Diller, Diane Von Furstenberg, and Vanity Fair’s own Radhika Jones, as well as the museum’s director, Bill Kramer, and its Chief Artistic and Programming officer, Jacqueline Stewart.

Source: The Superstars Align for the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures’ Opening Gala | Vanity Fair