Category Archives: Film & Movies

Film & Movies

Manifest’s Biggest Questions Answered & Mysteries Explained | screenrant

The passengers of Flight 828 have long attempted to understand the Callings, and they have solved some of the show’s biggest mysteries in season 3.

By Nicholas Raymond, Published 2 days ago

Image from article…

Manifest’s abrupt cancellation left a number of loose ends, but not all of the show’s mysteries went unsolved.

Over the course of its three-season run, the Flight 828 passengers have worked hard at heeding the Callings they receive in each episode.

Due to their investigations and attempts to understand the meaning behind these messages, the characters have learned a lot during their journeys.

Ever since the show began, Ben (Josh Dallas), Michaela (Melissa Roxburgh), Saanvi (Parveen Khaur), and all the others have been determined to find out the truth behind the plane’s disappearance, the purpose of the Callings, and how they can survive the Death Date.

Later, the Al-Zuras reveal, Zeke (Matt Long), and other related discoveries made them realize that Flight 828 wasn’t an isolated incident. Unexplained vanishings and sudden returns like what occurred with their plane have happened at other points in human history.

Following these leads has resulted in some important revelations, thanks in large part to the introduction of Eureka in season 3. Though the government-sanctioned operation hasn’t always been on the same page as the passengers, their scientific resources have proved useful.

Source: Manifest’s Biggest Questions Answered & Mysteries Explained

Roadrunner movie: The Anthony Bourdain documentary is no hagiography | SLATE

Roadrunner is a brilliant, sometimes troubling documentary about a brilliant, sometimes troubling man.

Footage of Anthony Bourdain from Roadrunner. CNN/Focus Features

By Dana Stevens, July 13, 202111:03 AM

Within seconds of the opening of Roadrunner, a new documentary from the Oscar-winning filmmaker Morgan Neville (20 Feet from Stardom,Won’t You Be My Neighbor?), the writer, chef, and TV personality Anthony Bourdain is already talking about death.

Sitting at a table with an unseen companion, he says that he has no investment in what happens to his remains after he is gone, except insofar as it might provide “entertainment value” for his body to be, say, fed into a woodchipper and sprayed around the London department store Harrods at rush hour.

Given that Bourdain died by suicide in 2018 during the filming of an episode of his CNN show Parts Unknown in Alsace, France, this mordant joke takes on extra-gruesome meaning—and as a montage later on in the movie shows, it was far from the only time he cracked wise on camera about his own death.

In its mix of playful irreverence and punk-rock attitude, the put-me-in-a-woodchipper-at-Harrods line is pure Bourdain, an example of the way he could charm, seduce, shock, and amuse all at the same time.

Source: https://slate.com/culture/2021/07/roadrunner-anthony-bourdain-documentary-movie-asia-argento.html

Independence Day Movie 25th Year Anniversary Retro Review | gizmodo

The 1996 Will Smith, Jeff Goldblum alien invasion film reveals new themes on its silver anniversary.

By Germain Lussier, Today 11:30AM

The sheer audacity of the spaceships.
Photo: Fox

It’s been 25 years since the first time I ever bought advanced tickets to see a movie.

I know this because that movie was Independence Day, and it opened 25 years ago this week. After seeing its unforgettable Super Bowl commercial, I immediately became obsessed with the movie and knew I had to see it as soon as possible.

So on July 2, 1996, I walked into the theater optimistic I was going to see something special and the film delivered. In the 25 years since that day, I’ve probably seen it 25 times. Not only has it become my go-to film to watch over the U.S. holiday weekend, anytime it’s on TV, I have to keep it on. It’s funny, exciting, massive, I loved it. I still do, mainly because watching it brings me back to being that geeky teenager seeing an amazing movie on its opening night.

Since July 2, 1996, that’s basically all Independence Day has been to me: an entertaining dose of nostalgia. But revisiting it last week in anticipation of its 25th anniversary I realized it’s so much more. It plays differently with a few decades of life experience under your belt and as much as I adored it in 1996, I may love it even more in 2021.

Source: Independence Day Movie 25th Year Anniversary Retro Review

UFO report: U.S. unable to explain more than 140 unidentified flying objects, finds no evidence of alien life – The Washington Post

By Shane Harris and Missy Ryan, June 25, 2021 at 2:34 p.m. PDT

The USS Russell and the USS Omaha captured video appearing to show UFOs flying, hovering and splashing into the ocean. (Jeremy Corbell)

The report finds no evidence that the objects, characterized as unidentified aerial phenomena, or UAPs, were the handiwork of alien beings. But in almost all of the 144 cases that a team of government experts examined, a lack of data stymied their efforts to say definitively what they were.

The U.S. government was unable to determine whether more than 140 unidentified flying objects, many of them reported by Navy aviators, were atmospheric events playing tricks on sensors or crafts piloted by foreign adversaries, or whether the objects were extraterrestrial in origin, according to a long-anticipated report released Friday by the nation’s top intelligence official.

Editor’s Note: See the link below for the full report links.

Source: UFO report: U.S. unable to explain more than 140 unidentified flying objects, finds no evidence of alien life – The Washington Post

Even as shows like ‘Mare of Easttown’ create buzz, the idea of the broader TV hit is going away – The Washington Post

Astute observers of television say the idea of a unifying show on even a modest scale is gone. In its wake are a hundred Twitter niches — and a dangerous lack of common culture.

By Steven Zeitchik, June 22, 2021 at 5:00 a.m. PDT

(Emma Kumer/Washington Post illustration)

On one level, “Mare of Easttown” was a smashing success.

The Pennsylvania-set crime series starring Kate Winslet inspired numerous memes, truckloads of media coverage and even a “Saturday Night Live” parody after it debuted on HBO in April.

More importantly, thanks to its head-fake mysteries and town with more secrets than beer bottles, the show quadrupled its audience between its premiere and its finale. That’s the good news.

The bad news is that its audience began modestly enough that even with all that growth, the finale was watched by only 4 million people over Memorial Day weekend. For all its buzzy enthusiasm and hardcore fan interest, the “Mare” finale was not seen that weekend by nearly 99 percent of Americans.

The television hit — the most abiding of entertainment traditions — appears to be dying. That isn’t to say shows don’t have fans; they do, and some of them are more passionate than ever. But according to its long-standing definition — a universally recognized show that gathers a large, verifiable audience and becomes unavoidable in all the places people talk about television and endures well beyond its run — the TV hit is vanishing.

From article…

Source: Even as shows like ‘Mare of Easttown’ create buzz, the idea of the broader TV hit is going away – The Washington Post