Tag Archives: Science

The 10 fastest-growing science and technology jobs of the next decade | CNBC

Published Mon, Oct 11 202110:51 AM EDT, by Morgan Smith@thewordsmithm

Female scientist using pipette in modern research laboratory
Morsa Images | DigitalVision | Getty Images

While the coronavirus pandemic has battered some industries, others have thrived despite the ongoing crisis, including technology and science.

In fact, according to new data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, demand for jobs in math, science and technology will continue to surge over the next decade.

Hiring in the computer and information technology fields has faster projected growth between 2020 and 2030 than all other fields. The Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that demand for these workers stems from companies’ “greater emphasis on cloud computing, the collection and storage of big data, and information security.”

The coronavirus pandemic has expedited demand for other science and technology roles as well, including epidemiologists and information security analysts. “The prevalence of remote work has created additional need for network security and operations support,” Megan Slabinski, the district president for global talent solutions at recruitment firm Robert Half, tells CNBC Make It. Slabinski specializes in recruiting for technology positions.

JobProjected Growth RateMedian Pay
Statisticians35.40%$92,270
Information security analysts33.30%$103,590
Data scientists and mathematical science occupations31.40%$98,230
Epidemiologists29.60%$74,560
Operations research analysts24.60%$86,200
Actuaries24.50%$111,030
Software developers and software quality assurance analysts, testers22.20%$110,140
Computer and information research scientists21.90%$126,830
Medical scientists (except epidemiologists)16.90%$91,510
Forensic science technicians15.60%$60,590
From article…

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Get the data

Source: The 10 fastest-growing science and technology jobs of the next decade

A Big Bet on Nanotechnology Has Paid Off – Scientific American

The National Nanotechnology Initiative promised a lot. It has delivered more

By Chad Mirkin, October 9th, 2021

Credit: Getty Images

We’re now more than two decades out from the initial announcement of the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), a federal program from President Bill Clinton founded in 2000 to support nanotechnology research and development in universities, government agencies and industry laboratories across the United States.

It was a significant financial bet on a field that was better known among the general public for science fiction than scientific achievement.

Today it’s clear that the NNI did more than influence the direction of research in the U.S. It catalyzed a worldwide effort and spurred an explosion of creativity in the scientific community.

And we’re reaping the rewards not just in medicine, but also clean energy, environmental remediation and beyond.

Source: A Big Bet on Nanotechnology Has Paid Off – Scientific American

How much water should you drink in a day? | Popular Science

The answer isn’t as simple as you might think.

By Claire Maldarelli | Published Sep 21, 2021 8:00 AM

Morphart via Deposit Photos

There are many luxuries in life, but water is decidedly not one of them.

Most of us are aware that we all need the liquid to survive, but exactly how much of it is necessary is surprisingly complex. There’s a popular notion that we all need to be chugging eight cups of water everyday for optimal health.

While it is true that staying hydrated will certainly help contribute to your body working at its best, there’s no evidence to suggest that consistently drinking eight glasses of water a day is needed. In reality, each person’s water intake needs vary, and they depend on a number of factors, including how much exercise you get, the weather conditions of where you are, what you eat, and other health conditions you might have.

Taking all these factors into account, the purported eight glasses a day just doesn’t work for most people. And our bodies already have an easy way to tell us if we need water: thirst. You can quickly replenish your lost fluids with a good helping of water. The human body has a carefully calibrated system for deciding when it needs more hydration and by listening to its cues, you can ensure you stay on top of your hydration needs.

Source: How much water should you drink in a day? | Popular Science

EarthSky | What is time, and why does it move forward?

Posted by EarthSky Voices September 19, 2021 and
By Thomas Kitching, UCL

We think of the universe as having a timeline, a point at which it began, until now. But how much do modern cosmologists really know about time? Image via Alex Mittelmann/ Wikimedia.

A bell-shaped funnel with grid lines on it and ‘Big Bang’ written at the narrow end.

Imagine time running backwards. People would grow younger instead of older and, after a long life of gradual rejuvenation – unlearning everything they know – they would end as a twinkle in their parents’ eyes.

That’s time as represented in a novel by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick but, surprisingly, time’s direction is also an issue that cosmologists are grappling with.

While we take for granted that time has a given direction, physicists don’t: most natural laws are “time reversible” which means they would work just as well if time was defined as running backwards. So why does time always move forward? And will it always do so?

Source: EarthSky | What is time, and why does it move forward?

Intellectual bees, doyenne of dark matter, and mathematical grief: Books in brief | Nature


Andrew Robinson reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

Bright Galaxies, Dark Matter, and Beyond, Ashley Jean Yeager MIT Press (2021)

‘More matter than meets the eye’ is a chapter title of this insightful biography of the pioneering astronomer Vera Rubin by science journalist Ashley Yeager, who interviewed her in later life. Best known for her observations of galactic rotation rates, which provided evidence for the existence of dark matter, Rubin also campaigned for equality in science. Her many honours did not include a Nobel prize, but a new observatory in Chile bears her name and this is the second biography of her in a year (see A. Abbott Nature 591, 523–524; 2021).

From article…

Source: Intellectual bees, doyenne of dark matter, and mathematical grief: Books in brief

Monarch butterflies are beloved—and declining for this sad reason | Popular Science

Scientists trawled thousands of volunteer surveys over 25 years to understand what imperils the insects.

By Kate Baggaley | Updated Jul 21, 2021 12:00 PM

From article…

For the past three decades, monarch butterflies have been dwindling.

The iconic bugs face a number of threats in North America, from weed killers to climate change, but it hasn’t been clear which one has been the most damaging. A new study, however, indicates that the butterflies are especially sensitive to weather conditions in their spring and summer breeding grounds.

Scientists analyzed data from more than 18,000 monarch counts from across the United States, Mexico, and Canada spanning 25 years. They found that over the past 15 years, climate had an influence on the eastern monarch population that was nearly seven times that of other variables such as herbicide use.

Source: Monarch butterflies are beloved—and declining for this sad reason | Popular Science