Tag Archives: Libraries

New York Public Library: The best books of 2022 | Time Out

Including books for adults, for kids and teens.

Written by Anna Rahmanan, Tuesday November 29 2022

Photograph: Shutterstock

The Brooklyn Public Library recently revealed its list of most borrowed books of all time, but if you still need some literary inspiration (or holiday gift ideas!), we suggest you consult the New York Public Library’s just-released recommendations for best books of the year.

The institution’s lists have become an annual tradition for the past century and, in recent years, the pundits have even issued directories of tomes for teens and others written in Spanish.

Expert librarians have looked through almost 3,000 titles and settled on a fraction of them to make up four lists this year: best new books for adults, best new books for kids, best new books for teens and best books in Spanish for kids.

You can browse through each category in full right here and, below, find a selection of some entries in each group.

Best books for adults

  • The Genesis of Misery by Neon Yang
  • The High Desert: Black. Punk. Nowhere–A Memoir by James Spooner
  • A Lady For a Duke by Alexis Hall
  • Nettle & Bone by T. Kingfisher
  • Path of Totality: Poems by Niina Pollari
  • Shutter: A Novel by Ramona Emerson
  • Solito: A Memoir by Javier Zamora
  • The Song of the Cell by Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin by Kevin Eastman, Peter Laird & Tom Waltz
  • Vladimir: A Novel by Julia May Jonas

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: New York Public Library: The best books of 2022

Exclusive: The Brooklyn Public Library is announcing its most borrowed books of all time – Gothamist

By Kerry Shaw. Published Nov 14, 2022, Modified Nov 14, 2022

screenshot from article…

We’ve got the list. You might not expect to find “Candide” and “Captain Underpants” on the same lineup, but here we are.

Since late October, the Brooklyn Public Library has been releasing information about the most popular books in its 125-year history. The “drops” have been happening online, every weekday, ten titles at a time, as part of its “Top 125 Most Borrowed Books” countdown. As of this writing, the library has revealed all but their top five most popular titles.

Today, the wait is over, and Gothamist has an exclusive look at the all-time top five.

Top 5 Most Borrowed Books of All Time at the Brooklyn Public Library

  1. “Where the Wild Things Are,” Maurice Sendak
  2. “The Snowy Day,” Ezra Jack Keats
  3. “The Cat in the Hat,” Dr. Seuss
  4. “A Christmas Carol,” Charles Dickens
  5. “Are You My Mother?” PD Eastman

Source: Exclusive: The Brooklyn Public Library is announcing its most borrowed books of all time – Gothamist

How libraries became refuges for people with mental illness.

By Anthony Aycock, Sept 22, 20225:50 AM

Photo illustration by Natalie Matthews-Ramo/Slate. Photo by Chanvre Québec on Unsplash and Pawel_B/iStock/Getty Images Plus.

Welcome to State of Mind, a new section from Slate and Arizona State University dedicated to exploring mental health. Follow us on Twitter.

The Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges is often credited with saying that “Paradise is a library.” He must not have meant a downtown public library, circa 8 p.m. Such places, like most communal spheres, can be a challenge to oversee.

Some people treat them like a sort of roomless hotel, sleeping in chairs and bathing in restrooms. I used to watch a man who looked like the famous woodcut of Blackbeard the Pirate ride the escalator of my three-story library up, down, up, down. For hours. Carrying a duffel bag. He never bothered anyone, so our security officers left him alone. (Can’t say the same for the lady of the evening who was meeting clients in the stairwell.)

Then there are the questions from believers in Qanon. Election deniers. Sovereign citizens. The woman who ranted about the “news” that the World Health Organization was going to “force a vote to allow them to take over the U.S. and force a lockdown like China.” (If WHO had that kind of power, why bother with a vote?)

The man who asked me how he and a few of his buddies could get into the governor’s office to “remove him” over pandemic closures. (Would that all insurrectionists did such thorough research!) Declinism is the feeling that everything is getting harder, scarier, and weirder, and a lot of people seem to have it.

Work in a library, I want to tell them, and you’ll learn what weird is.

Source: https://slate.com/technology/2022/09/libraries-mental-health-support.html

From book stacks to psychosis and food stamps, librarians confront a new workplace | Salon.com

As America’s social safety net decays, librarians are feeling less safe doing their jobs

By Rachel Scheier, Published August 24, 2022 8:15AM (EDT)

Stack Of Books On Table In Library (Getty Images/Rachan Panya/EyeEm)

For nearly two decades, Lisa Dunseth loved her job at San Francisco’s main public library, particularly her final seven years in the rare books department.

But like many librarians, she saw plenty of chaos. Patrons racked by untreated mental illness or high on drugs sometimes spit on library staffers or overdosed in the bathrooms. She remembers a co-worker being punched in the face on his way back from a lunch break. One afternoon in 2017, a man jumped to his death from the library’s fifth-floor balcony.

Dunseth retired the following year at age 61, making an early exit from a nearly 40-year career.

“The public library should be a sanctuary for everyone,” she said. The problem was she and many of her colleagues no longer felt safe doing their jobs.

Via: Library Link of the Day, http://www.tk421.net/librarylink/  (archive, rss, subscribe options)

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: https://www.salon.com/2022/08/24/from-book-stacks-to-psychosis-and-stamps-librarians-confront-a-new-workplace_partner/

Is Your School Facing a Book Challenge? These Online Resources May Help | Education Week

By Ileana Najarro — September 01, 2022

Amanda Darrow, the director of youth, family, and education programs at the Utah Pride Center in Salt Lake City, poses with books that have been the subject of complaints from parents in recent weeks.
Rick Bowmer/AP Photo

Book challenges, restrictions, and outright bans on materials in K-12 classrooms and school libraries are popping up more and more across the country these days.

Though such challenges are a perennial problem, school districts have seen an uptick in requests to ban books about LGBTQ characters, race, and racism. A PEN America report found that 2 million students in 86 school districts across the country have had their access to books restricted this past school year. And the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom is now getting reports of at least two—and sometimes three or four—book challenges a day, when in the past they would get that many cases per week, said the office’s director, Deborah Caldwell-Stone.

Some educators have been successful in overturning such efforts by supporting students eager to push back, a balancing act requiring them to observe constitutional boundaries about student protests and First Amendment rights. Yet many now teach in states where pushback to book challenges can be even trickier, thanks to new laws that more broadly restrict how topics such as race and gender are discussed in school.

Source: https://www.edweek.org/teaching-learning/is-your-school-facing-a-book-challenge-these-online-resources-may-help/2022/09