Tag Archives: New York

American Business History in “The Gilded Age” | Inside Adams: Science, Technology & Business | Library of Congress

February 24, 2022 by Ellen Terrell

Given its underlying business themes, The Gilded Age, which premiered on HBO in January 2022, quickly caught my attention.

The show’s first season, which is set in 1882 in the rapidly changing New York City landscape, revolves around the clash between the mores of old New York society and the emerging world of newly rich industrialists and financiers.

The Central Bank, 1910. Frank A. Nankivell, artist.

The show’s title, Gilded Age, references the period in American history from approximately 1870-1900, but where did the phrase itself come from, and what is so special about this time in American history?

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: American Business History in “The Gilded Age” | Inside Adams: Science, Technology & Business

Sherlock Holmes, Scientific Detective | The New Yorker

Arthur Conan Doyle’s creation was born into an age of stunning change. How did Holmes react to his era?

By Rivka Galchen, January 31, 2022

The exhibit “Sherlock Holmes in 221 Objects” devotes special attention to Conan Doyle’s “A Study in Scarlet” and “The Hound of the Baskervilles”—which feature notably different Holmeses.Photograph by Charlie Rubin / Courtesy The Grolier Club

The Grolier Club, a private society for bibliophiles on the Upper East Side, with its marble foyer and dark wood-panelled gallery, would be a fine stage for a nineteenth-century fictional murder, perhaps done in the library with a candlestick, most certainly involving a will.

On January 12th, an exhibit called “Sherlock Holmes in 221 Objects” opened there. It features a proper Baker Street-number of items from the collection of Glen S. Miranker, a former executive at Apple, who has been buying all manner of things Holmesian since 1977.

There are a number of Arthur Conan Doyle’s letters; an “idea book” in which he jotted notes for possible future stories; and a never-before-displayed speech, written by hand, in which Conan Doyle talks about why he killed off Holmes. There are also handwritten manuscript pages and a pirated copy of “The Sign of the Four,” which Conan Doyle apparently signed, despite loathing the pirating practice.

Source: Sherlock Holmes, Scientific Detective | The New Yorker

Christmas in New York: 15 Festive Things To Do in NYC | Condé Nast Traveler

Our editors’ favorite holiday activities in the city they call home.

By Alex Erdekian, December 7, 2020

Getty, from article screenshot

We’re all looking for silver linings these days—and we’ve got one for you.

This Christmas season in New York City is sort of peaceful. There are fewer tourists crowding Midtown sidewalks, no social pressure to attend every holiday happy hour, and, more importantly, no Santa Con!

One thing that hasn’t changed, however, is that NYC in December holds the power to grow the hearts of the Grinchiest of us.

Even this year, there is more than a little magic to be found. To help you find the best of it, our editors who call the city home share their favorite Christmastime traditions—nostalgic standbys you’ll recognize from the scenes of Elf, seasonal restaurant rituals, and neighborhood celebrations that put them in the holiday spirit.

Andrew F Kazmierski/Getty ..ice skating at Bryant Park…

Source: Christmas in New York: 15 Festive Things To Do in NYC | Condé Nast Traveler

Smithsonian Artifacts That Tell the Story of 9/11 | At the Smithsonian | Smithsonian Magazine

From a Pentagon rescuer’s uniform to a Flight 93 crew log, these objects commemorate the 20th anniversary of a national tragedy

By Meilan Solly, SMITHSONIANMAG.COM | Sept. 8, 2021, 8:43 a.m.

Screenshot…

Following the tragedies that took place on September 11, 2001, curators at the Smithsonian Institution recognized the urgency of documenting this unprecedented moment in American history.

After Congress designated the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History as the official repository for all related objects, photographs and documents, staff focused their attention on three areas: the attacks themselves, first responders and recovery efforts.

As time passed, curators expanded their purview to include the nation’s response to the tragedy, recording 9/11’s reverberations across the country. “This effectively put a net over the story, covering what happened on that day, then plus one month, plus one year,” says Cedric Yeh, curator of the museum’s National September 11 Collection.

“But [this net] had a lot of holes. I don’t mean holes in the curators’ work, but [rather], there were areas not covered because it was impossible to cover the entirety of the story.”

Source: Smithsonian Artifacts That Tell the Story of 9/11 | At the Smithsonian | Smithsonian Magazine