Tag Archives: Southern

The Real Places That Gave Rise to Southern Fictions | The New Yorker

By Casey Cep, January 12, 2022

“Church, Highway 47, Alabama, 2018.”

There is a cheap way of invoking the American South—common to country songs and television shows and pulpy novels—that involves setting the scene with cornfields or battlefields and setting the table with gravy and grits.

You know that you’re in the midst of it when an otherwise deracinated character drops his final “G”s and says something about livin’ high on the hog or complains about how it’s colder outside than a witch’s tit.

But it takes more than kudzu or a Mason jar to make a work of Southern fiction. A real sense of place requires something else—more verb than noun, not a thing but a way of being.

Editor’s Note; May be behind paywall, sorry…

Source: The Real Places That Gave Rise to Southern Fictions | The New Yorker

A St. Patrick’s Day Classic: Corned Beef & Cabbage – Paula Deen

By The PD Web Team

Corned Beef & Cabbage is a classic St. Patrick’s Day dish, and this recipe, which features a Southern twist, is an easy one to make.

That should free up your time and brainpower for enjoying the rest of your festivities. Does easy, delicious, and festive sound like a winning combination for you? Then, let’s not […]

Editor’s Note: You can, of course, skip the hot sauce 😉

Source: A St. Patrick’s Day Classic: Corned Beef & Cabbage – Paula Deen

John D. MacDonald’s Mission to Save Florida | CrimeReads

“Last fall, as part of the annual Bouchercon celebration of mysteries and their authors, one panel was devoted to discussing a writer who’s been dead for three decades and a character who last appeared in a book when Reagan was in the White House. One of the panelists, Ace Atkins (The Sinners) showed up in a T-shirt that proclaimed: “BASTARD CHILD OF TRAVIS MCGEE.” Immediately the other panelists all clamored for identical shirts. I was one of them.”

Editor’s Note: I have read, years ago, all of his Travis McGee books; I have one around now, in the garage collection.

Source: John D. MacDonald’s Mission to Save Florida | CrimeReads

Paul Theroux Deep South; More World War I Sites

Author Paul Theroux shares the insights he gleaned about America from the people he met in the small towns and backroads of the Deep South. Then history professor Mark D. Van Ells returns with more suggestions for visiting places that honor the sacrifices of Allied troops in World War I. For more information on Travel with Rick Steves – including episode descriptions, program archives and related details – visit http://www.ricksteves.com.

  • * Duration: 51:17

* Published: 10/20/17 5:00:00 PM

* Episode Download Link: http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/podcasts.ricksteves.com/feeds/pgm445a_pod.mp3

* Episode Feed: Travel with Rick Steves – http://podcasts.ricksteves.com/ricksteves.xml

The Foxfire Book Series That Preserved Appalachian Foodways : The Salt : NPR

Foxfire started as a class project at a Georgia high school in the ’60s, but soon became a magazine, then a book, and even a way of teaching about the region’s simple, self-sustaining way of life.

Source: The Foxfire Book Series That Preserved Appalachian Foodways : The Salt : NPR

How I Mastered the Art (and Politics) of Cornbread Dressing – The New York Times

Cornbread dressing, a Southern alternative for Thanksgiving. Credit Melina Hammer for The New York Times

Navigating the treacherous shoals of Southern custom, class, region — and Grandma.

Source: How I Mastered the Art (and Politics) of Cornbread Dressing – The New York Times