Tag Archives: Sherlock Holmes

The Complete Sherlock Holmes : Sir Arthur Conan Doyle : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

The Complete Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Publication date 1927 Publisher doubleday & company, inc. Collection internet archive books Digitizing sponsor Kahle/Austin Foundation Contributor Internet Archive Language English Volume 2

title page…

Editor’s Note: Now free of copyright, multiple versions available for download. See also Volume 1

Source: The Complete Sherlock Holmes : Sir Arthur Conan Doyle : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

The complete Sherlock Holmes : Volume 1: Arthur Conan Doyle : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

The complete Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle Publication date 1927 Collection internetarchivebooks Digitizing sponsor Kahle/Austin Foundation Contributor Internet Archive Language English Volume 1

cover image…

Editor’s Note: Now free of copyright, multiple versions available for download. See also Volume 2.

Source: The complete Sherlock Holmes : Arthur Conan Doyle : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

Sherlock Holmes will finally escape copyright this weekend – The Verge

Metropolis, To The Lighthouse, and the final Holmes stories are all entering the public domain.

By Adi Robertson / @thedextriarchy, Dec 28, 2022, 10:00 AM PST

A portrait of Holmes by artist Sidney Paget.
Wikimedia

Watching the copyrights on art expire still feels like a novelty. After all, the US public domain was frozen in time for 20 years, thawing only in 2019. But this weekend’s Public Domain Day will give our cultural commons a few particularly notable new works.

As outlined by Duke Law School’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain, the start of 2023 will mark the end of US copyrights on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s final Sherlock Holmes stories — along with the seminal science fiction movie Metropolis, Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, and the first full-length “talkie” film The Jazz Singer.

The public domain lets anyone republish, remix, or remake works without the permission of the rights holder — typically long after the original author is dead. In previous years, it’s created booms around new interpretations of works like The Great Gatsby, which entered the public domain in 2021.

More generally, you can thank it for Dracula Daily, a newsletter that creatively recontextualized the classic vampire novel, or its spiritual successor Whale Weekly about Moby Dick. And as the Duke summary points out, the public domain frees archivists to preserve and redistribute works that might otherwise be lost, like a wealth of silent films (including Metropolis) whose copyright is definitively expiring this year.

Source: Sherlock Holmes will finally escape copyright this weekend – The Verge

Appreciating the mystery of “Endeavour” as the detective prequel approaches the end | Salon.com

After 10 years as the youthful version of a great TV detective, have we taken Shaun Evans’ Morse for granted?

By Melanie McFarland, Published June 19, 2022 3:30PM (EDT)

Shaun Evans as Morse in “Endeavor” (Courtesy of Mammoth Screen and MASTERPIECE)

Sometimes I contemplate an alternate timeline where “Sherlock” never existed and wonder whether “Endeavour” and its star Shaun Evans may have claimed whatever secret chamber in our hearts that Benedict Cumberbatch’s detective conquered.

The two detectives have a few things in common, after all. Sherlock Holmes and Endeavour Morse are two of many crime-solvers adapted from literature featured under the “Masterpiece Mystery!” tent recently interpreted as younger men in their prime.

Each has a long relationship with television, although Holmes’ overcoat has been worn by an assortment of actors. Morse is associated with two: Evans and the late John Thaw, who originated the character in “Inspector Morse,” which aired from 1987 through 1993, and was revived for five special installments that ran between 1995 and 2000.

Source: Appreciating the mystery of “Endeavour” as the detective prequel approaches the end | Salon.com

Opinion: Is Sherlock Holmes really the father of modern forensic science? – CNN

Opinion by Roy Schwartz, Updated 2:06 PM ET, Fri May 20, 2022

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is seen in this 1922 photo. (AP Photo)

(CNN) May 22 is “Sherlock Holmes Day,” honoring the birthday of his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Holmes, who turns 135 this year, is one of the most famous literary characters in the world and probably the most famous detective.

He’s come to be referenced as a historical figure rather than a fictional one (often at the expense of his actual author), with countless legends surrounding him. Perhaps the most popular is that he invented modern forensic science.

A reproduction of a copy of the book ‘A Study in Scarlet’ by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 8th December 1986. (Photo by Georges De Keerle/Getty Images)

This particular aspect of Holmes lore has been addressed in articles, books, documentaries, and college courses and is even cited by forensic experts. But is it really true?

Did Sherlock Holmes (meaning Doyle) invent crime-solving methods like fingerprinting and blood testing years and even decades before law enforcement?

If he did, it would mean that, aside from entertaining generations of readers and viewers and inspiring dozens of other popular characters like Batman and House, M.D., he also deserves credit for helping solve thousands, if not millions, of crimes in the real world.

Source: Opinion: Is Sherlock Holmes really the father of modern forensic science? – CNN

“The game is afoot” at a NYC Sherlock Holmes exhibit – CBS News | Sunday Morning

Updated on: April 10, 2022 / 10:15 AM / CBS News

“The game is afoot” at a NYC Sherlock Holmes exhibit

It wasn’t easy for Glen Miranker to select what to share from his Sherlockian trove when he and his wife, Cathy, created the exhibit, “Sherlock Holmes in 221 Objects,” now on display at the Grolier Club in New York City.

A former executive at Apple, Miranker has amassed a treasure of Holmesiana – first editions, pirated copies, illustrations, and letters – that today comprises about 8,000 objects.

Source: “The game is afoot” at a NYC Sherlock Holmes exhibit – CBS News