Tag Archives: Communities

10 Things Retirement Communities Won’t Tell You | Next Avenue

From hidden fees to whether there’s a doctor in the house, do your research

By Elizabeth O’Brien and MarketWatch

(This article appeared previously on MarketWatch.com.)

Photo by Monica Silvestre on Pexels.com

These are 10 things retirement communities won’t tell you.

If you’re looking for one, be sure you know about them.

1. You’ll need a Ph.D. to tell us apart. Active-adult communities, assisted-living facilities, continuing-care retirement communities — that’s just the tip of the jargon iceberg for places people 55 and over might spend their golden years.

And since each facility uses different terms and has different pricing structures, comparison-shopping becomes very difficult. “You can go crazy learning the terminology,” says Karyl Cafiero, 61, of Brooklyn, N.Y., who has researched communities for her mother-in-law.

The senior housing industry has largely recovered from its slump during the Great Recession, when many prospective residents couldn’t relocate because they couldn’t sell their homes.

Assisted living facilities and continuing-care retirement communities aim for occupancy rates between 90 percent and 95 percent and are currently at the lower end of this range, says Andrew Carle, executive-in-residence at the program in senior housing administration at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va.

Source: 10 Things Retirement Communities Won’t Tell You | Next Avenue

The Villages is a retirement ‘paradise’ — so why is that a problem? – MarketWatch

More older adults realize that intergenerational connections are not just valuable for them but for their communities and country.

By Paul Irving, Last Updated: Sept. 25, 2021 at 8:17 a.m. ET, First Published: Sept. 21, 2021 at 4:58 a.m. ET

This article is reprinted by permission from NextAvenue.org.

Residents watch presidential election returns at an Election Night party organized by a group called Villagers for Trump.
AFP/Getty Images

The Villages, a master-planned retirement community in central Florida, is the fastest-growing metropolitan area in the U.S., we learned from the 2020 Census.

In a demographically changing and urbanizing America, this predominantly white, politically conservative stronghold bucked the trend as retirees lured by warm winters and pastel-hued homes surrounded by golf carts and pickleball courts, flocked in.

We are all free to choose how and where we want to live, of course, and new housing solutions for the rapidly growing population of older Americans are needed.

But, to be honest, if communities like the Villages represent the future of aging, please count me, and many of us, out.

Source: The Villages is a retirement ‘paradise’ — so why is that a problem? – MarketWatch

‘Remember the Internet’: An Encyclopedia of Online Life – The Atlantic

How do we memorialize life online when it’s constantly disappearing?

by Kaitlyn Tiffany, March 22, 2021

Jim Steele / Popperfoto / Getty / Wikimedia / The Atlantic

For many of us, for better or for worse, the internet is home.

Our communities are here, because many of them could not exist any other way.

Superfans, shitposters, amateur experts, wiki nerds, grizzled forum moderators, obsessive sneaker enthusiasts, and hobbyists who spend a substantial amount of their time photographing vintage Furbies in human clothes, for example—the cultural and creative output of these communities is enormous and ever growing.

Source: ‘Remember the Internet’: An Encyclopedia of Online Life – The Atlantic

Library of Congress Builds New Collections Documenting COVID-19 Pandemic | Library of Congress

The Library’s wide-ranging collecting to document the COVID-19 pandemic includes such artworks as “Mask Up” by Lisa Vollrath and “La Teacher” by Alfredo Ponce, both courtesy of Amplifier, the photograph “Donut Line” by Peter Rintels, “Seniors First” by Toni Lane and “Thank You” by Thomas Wimberly, courtesy of Amplifier. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Collections Include Photographs of Community Impact, Web Archiving of Public Health Data and Artist Responses to the Health Crisis

Press Contact: Brett Zongker, (202) 707-1639, bzongker@loc.gov

As the world marks the one-year anniversary of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the Library of Congress has been collecting materials and documenting this time in history through a variety of initiatives.

The Library’s rapid-response collecting since the start of lockdowns and social distancing measures over the past year has included acquiring photographs that document the pandemic’s impact on individuals and communities, capturing artists’ responses to the outbreak, mapping the pandemic’s spread and archiving the world’s response online

“The extraordinary impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in our communities, families and social interactions is unlike anything we’ve seen in the past century,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden.

From the article…

“Archivists and librarians at the Library of Congress are committed to documenting and preserving this difficult time in history through the eyes of artists…”

Source: Library of Congress Builds New Collections Documenting COVID-19 Pandemic | Library of Congress

Raleigh, Charlotte ranked among the best cities in America to live | News & Observer

Raleigh and Charlotte are ranked among the top cities in the United States to live based on crime rate, demography, economy, education, environment, health, housing, infrastructure and leisure.

Source: Raleigh, Charlotte ranked among the best cities in America to live | News & Observer

How public libraries help build healthy communities | Brookings Institution

Marcela Cabello and Stuart Butler examine the important role libraries play in communities.

 

“They say you can’t judge a book by its cover. Increasingly in the United States, you also can’t judge a library’s value to its community by simply its books. Let us explain.”

Source: How public libraries help build healthy communities | Brookings Institution