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What it felt like to live through a year of the coronavirus pandemic – Washington Post

Stories of what it felt like to live through the shutdown. Dancing alone, canceling weddings, missing touch, missing one another and feeling alone together.

The coronavirus pandemic brought out stories of profound grief and heroic resolve.

These are not those stories.

Instead, at this one-year mark, Style reporters set out to note some of the other, countless emotions and personal losses: The almost-9-year-old who never felt like she got to be 8. The 102-year-old who lives in mandated isolation. The massage therapist and her customers who simply crave touch.

The couple who postponed their big wedding — and may have to postpone it again. The single person losing her last sense of social contact. The DJ who spins for an empty room. The college freshman who has never set foot on campus.

Shutdowns, lockdowns, quarantines — whatever you called this long and lost time, these stories acknowledge the persistent disconnect, all that absence, and what it feels like to live in a suspended state of mind.

Source: What it felt like to live through a year of the coronavirus pandemic – Washington Post

CDC issues guidelines telling the vaccinated what they can do – The Washington Post

The CDC said people who are two weeks past their final shot face little risk if they visit indoors with unvaccinated members of a single household. (The Washington Post)
The CDC said people who are two weeks past their final shot face little risk if they visit indoors with unvaccinated members of a single household. (The Washington Post)

Long-awaited government guidelines loosen restrictions on how people can socialize, and see their grandchildren after they’re fully inoculated.

Federal health officials released guidance Monday that gives fully vaccinated Americans more freedom to socialize and pursue routine activities, providing a pandemic-weary nation a first glimpse of what a new normal may look like in the months ahead.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said people who are two weeks past their final shot face little risk if they visit indoors with unvaccinated members of a single household at low risk of severe disease, without wearing masks or distancing. That would free many vaccinated grandparents who live near their unvaccinated children and grandchildren to gather for the first time in a year. The guidelines continue to discourage long-distance travel, however.

The CDC also said fully vaccinated people can gather indoors with those who are also fully vaccinated. And they do not need to quarantine, or be tested after exposure to the coronavirus, as long as they have no symptoms.

Source: CDC issues guidelines telling the vaccinated what they can do – The Washington Post

How to plan for summer travel in 2021 – The Washington Post

(iStock/ Washington Post illustration)
(iStock/ Washington Post illustration)
While we may be traveling this summer, it won’t be the “old normal.” Here are travel experts’ predictions.

February 24

After a particularly brutal winter in isolation, summer travel dreams feel like a glimmer of hope shimmering on the distant horizon.

Source: How to plan for summer travel in 2021 – The Washington Post

Analysis | We’ve been cooped up with our families for almost a year. This is the result.

Toys are neatly lined up in the Elkridge, Md., backyard of Amy Phillips in April 2020. Phillips, a mental health counselor, and her husband, a government contractor, worked from home with their four kids. They had to let their nanny go before the lockdown and it's been chaos ever since. (Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post)
Toys are neatly lined up in the Elkridge, Md., backyard of Amy Phillips in April 2020. Phillips, a mental health counselor, and her husband, a government contractor, worked from home with their four kids. They had to let their nanny go before the lockdown and it’s been chaos ever since. (Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post)

When the pandemic forced us into our homes to spend extended periods in contact only with a small circle of family members, it was one of the fastest, largest shifts of human behavior in memory. We’re just starting to understand the fallout.

  • About 1 in 8 were home alone.
  • Almost 2 in 5 were home with kids.
  • Almost half were in a household with another adult who was also suddenly sent home.
  • More than two-thirds were home with another adult, such as a stay-at-home spouse or retiree.

Source: Analysis | We’ve been cooped up with our families for almost a year. This is the result.

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