Tag Archives: War

NLS Shares Ukrainian Books to Aid War Refugees | Library of Congress Blog | Library of Congress

February 8, 2023 by Neely Tucker

This is a guest post by Claire Rojstaczer, a writer-editor in the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled. It recently appeared in slightly different form in the Library’s Gazette.

People fleeing the war in Ukraine in March 2022, crossing into Moldova. Photo: UN Women/Aurel Obreja.

This is a guest post by Claire Rojstaczer, a writer-editor in the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled. It recently appeared in slightly different form in the Library’s Gazette.

Since Russia’s February 2022 invasion of Ukraine, a flood of Ukrainian refugees has washed over Europe. The National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled has found a way to help those distant refugees — thanks to an earlier wave of Ukrainian immigrants who settled in Cleveland, Ohio, some one hundred and forty years ago.

“I was attending a … meeting for the [International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions] section for libraries serving people with print disabilities in July when someone brought up the shortage of accessible Ukrainian-language books for refugees,” said Kelsey Corlett-Rivera, an NLS foreign language librarian.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: NLS Shares Ukrainian Books to Aid War Refugees | Library of Congress Blog

‘Our mission is crucial’: meet the warrior librarians of Ukraine | Libraries | The Guardian

When Russia invaded Ukraine, a key part of its strategy was to destroy historic libraries in order to eradicate the Ukrainians’ sense of identity. But Putin hadn’t counted on the unbreakable spirit of the country’s librarians

By Stephen Marche, Sun 4 Dec 2022 03.00 EST

Left on the shelf: Russian troops deliberately shelled this library in Chernihiv, northern Ukraine, in April 2022. Photograph: Rex/Shutterstock

The morning that Russian bombs started falling on Kyiv, Oksana Bruy woke up worried about her laptop. Bruy is president of the Ukrainian Library Association and, the night before, she hadn’t quite finished a presentation on the new plans for the Kyiv Polytechnic Library, so she had left her computer open at work. That morning, the street outside her house filled with the gunfire of Ukrainian militias executing Russian agents. Missile strikes drove her into an underground car park with her daughter, Anna, and her cat, Tom. A few days, later she crept back into the huge empty library, 15,000sqft once filled with the quiet murmurings of readers. As she grabbed her laptop, the air raid siren sounded and she rushed to her car.

Source: ‘Our mission is crucial’: meet the warrior librarians of Ukraine | Libraries | The Guardian

War as They Saw It | Library of Congress Blog | Library of Congress

By Neely Tucker, May 22, 2022

— This is a guest post by Nathan Cross, an archivist in the American Folklife Center. It first appeared in the Library of Congress Magazine.

A Soviet tank rusts in the Afghan countryside. Photo: Dean Baratta. Veterans History Project.

Service members long have used photography as a means of capturing the essence of their experiences.

As technology improved, cameras became more available, and pocket-sized digital cameras gave service members in Iraq and Afghanistan the freedom to take hundreds of photographs without having to worry about running out of film.

Today, hundreds of those images are housed in the collections of the Library’s Veterans History Project. The project recently released a research guide focused on photo collections contributed by veterans of the global war on terror that followed the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Joseph Beimfohr’s photos let viewers peek into his war.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: War as They Saw It | Library of Congress Blog

The Russian Invasion of Ukraine: Resources at the Library of Congress | Library of Congress Blog

March 3, 2022 by Neely Tucker

This 1648 map is one of the first to use “Ukraine” as the name for the region. Geography and Map Division.

The Russian invasion of Ukraine is the latest violent development in a long and turbulent history in the land of the steppes, and the Library has international resources on the region that go back for hundreds of years.

You can learn a lot here, from one of the first maps that used the name “Ukraine” for the area (in 1648), to the poetry and writings of national hero Taras Shevchenko in the 19th century, to up-to-the-minute news and analysis from the Congressional Research Service.

You can also watch an hourlong seminar, Putin, Ukraine, and What’s Likely to Happen, hosted by the Library’s Kluge Institute and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, recorded just before Russia invaded.

This article is a brief summary of the Library’s holdings regarding the region.

Shevchenko statue in Washington, D.C. Photo: Carol Highsmith. Prints and Photographs Division.

Some descriptions are from official Library documents.

First, it helps to know that Ukraine roughly translates as “frontier” and its location between Europe and Asia has meant that human beings have traipsed through it, going east or west, for thousands of years. It has been included in any number of empires, divided into many different configurations and called by any number of names before it declared independence in its current boundaries in 1991, after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Our primary documents thus refer to the region by the name (or names) it was known at the time. The maps, lithographs, books and manuscripts shine through with illuminations and hand-coloring from centuries long past.

Source: The Russian Invasion of Ukraine: Resources at the Library of Congress | Library of Congress Blog

Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman says West must not bend to Putin’s “nuclear saber-rattling” – CBS News

By David Morgan, February 28, 2022 / 1:31 PM / CBS News

An anti-war protest in Moscow, February 24, 2022. (The banner reads “No war. Freedom for political prisoners.”) Thousands have been arrested across Russia for protesting President Putin’s invasion of Ukraine.  EVGENIA NOVOZHENINA / REUTERS

As Ukraine continues to fight off Russian invaders, the sanctions imposed on Russia by the West are already having a devastating impact on that nation’s economy.

But they have not stopped President Vladimir Putin yet. Over the weekend he put his nuclear forces on high alert, raising new fears of an escalation.

On Monday retired Army Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman, who served as the European affairs director for the National Security Council, told “CBS Mornings” that this latest development is familiar to Kremlin watchers.

“Vladimir Putin is hoping through his nuclear saber-rattling that he’ll put us back on our heels, get us to be deeply concerned about the potential for nuclear escalation. But of course, for those in government, they understand that … we’ve had to deal with this threat throughout the Cold War, throughout the Soviet period, for generations,” Vindman said, “and that we had to respond to Russia’s belligerence and stay firm in supporting our national security interests. That’s part of it, is just not to bend because of the nuclear saber-rattling, because we’ve seen it before.”

Source: Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman says West must not bend to Putin’s “nuclear saber-rattling” – CBS News

Sources on the russo-ukrainian conflict, Part two: the Russian Military and Eastern Europe – Cold War & Internal Security (CWIS) Collection

The following is a select list of sources on the Russian armed forces and the military situation in eastern Europe since 2014. The focus is on material produced by the US federal government, though useful non-government and international resources are also provided.

Sources: Sources on the russo-ukrainian conflict, Part two: the Russian Military and Eastern Europe – Cold War & Internal Security (CWIS) Collection