Tag Archives: Stargazing

The Sky This Month October 2021 | Astronomy.com

FROM THE October 2021 ISSUE

Catch Mercury in the morning.

By Martin Ratcliffe, Alister Ling  |  Published: Friday, October 1, 2021

Mercury takes center stage in this early January 2018 shot. The solar system’s smallest planet once again rules the dawn twilight this month in its best morning appearance of 2021.

Mercury springs into action in the last two weeks of October, offering its best morning appearance for 2021.

Venus, by contrast, hangs low in the southwestern sky all month. Jupiter and Saturn dominate the evening sky, visible through midnight. And late-evening binocular views of Uranus and Neptune beckon more adventurous observers.

Let’s begin in the evening sky. Venus is visible soon after sunset, low in the southwest. It begins the month at magnitude –4.2 and brightens to –4.5 by Oct. 25.

The planet lies in Libra for the first week of October and crosses into Scorpius Oct. 7. Venus spends part of Oct. 15 crossing a small corner of Ophiuchus, before returning to Scorpius and passing 1.5° north of Antares on the 16th. It returns to Ophiuchus Oct. 21 and stays there through the end of the month.

Source: The Sky This Month October 2021 | Astronomy.com

In the Sky This Month | StarDate Online

Photo by Sam Kolder on Pexels.com

The stars of winter are marching toward the end of their annual evening run.

Orion is in the southwest at nightfall as April begins, for example, but is quite low in the west as the Sun begins to set by month’s end.

Sirius, the Dog Star, is to the lower left of Orion.

It’s the brightest true star in the entire night sky, so even though it’s quite low, it sparkles beautifully as it drops from view in the evening for another year.

Source: In the Sky This Month | StarDate Online

A Stargazing Road Trip Across the American Southwest | Condé Nast Traveler

Julien Capmeil

By Leslie Pariseau, Photography by Julien Capmeil

March 4, 2021

Americans are increasingly taking road trips that are about the skies as much as the land

The forecast was not promising. The sweeping New Mexican skies appeared clear, and ribbons of cerulean, violet, and indigo created an ombré horizon as the sun receded behind the West Mesa and the Rio Grande.

But the clouds would soon roll in. Outside the main house at Los Poblanos, a historic farm and inn on the edge of Albuquerque, an orange tabby curled up on a bench, an outdoor firepit was lit, a bottle of wine opened. There would be no stargazing this evening.

It hadn’t occurred to me that my entire quest—to trek across the high desert of the Southwest and into the mountains of Utah—could be thwarted by something as evanescent as the clouds. I flicked around an atmosphere-predicting app on my phone to see what the following evening might bring. Again, it augured obscurity.

Source: A Stargazing Road Trip Across the American Southwest | Condé Nast Traveler

News | NASA-funded Website Lets the Public Search for New Nearby Worlds

Citizen Science indeed.. don’t miss taking a look at the site for helping.. https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/marckuchner/backyard-worlds-planet-9


NASA is inviting the public to help search for possible undiscovered worlds in the outer reaches of our solar system and in neighboring interstellar space.

Source: News | NASA-funded Website Lets the Public Search for New Nearby Worlds