Tag Archives: National Film Registry

“Return of the Jedi,” Mark Hamill and the 2021 National Film Registry | Library of Congress Blog

December 14, 2021 by Neely Tucker

Mark Hamill as Luke Skywalker in a scene from “Return of the Jedi.” Photo: Lucasfilm/Walt Disney Company.

Video of announcement: https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-10132/

The National Film Registry’s 2021 class is the most diverse in the program’s 33-year history, including blockbusters such as “Return of the Jedi,” “Selena” and “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring,” but also the ’70s midnight-movie favorite “Pink Flamingos” and a 1926 film featuring Black pilots in the daring new world of aviation, “The Flying Ace.”

The 2021 selections, announced today, include movies dating back nearly 120 years and represent the work of Hollywood studios, independent filmmakers, documentarians, women directors, filmmakers of color, students and the silent era.

Most pointedly, the inductees also include a trio of documentaries that addressed murderous violence against Blacks, Asians and Latinos, respectively, in “The Murder of Fred Hampton,” Who Killed Vincent Chin?” and “Requiem-29.”

Source: “Return of the Jedi,” Mark Hamill and the 2021 National Film Registry | Library of Congress Blog

From the National Film Registry: Home Movie Day | Now See Hear! | Library of Congress

October 16, 2021 by Stacie Seifrit-Griffin

Still photo from “Our Day” in the National Film Registry

Today, we honor National Home Movie Day by not only highlighting the importance of home movies as historical and cultural documents, but also as a personal reflection that we are often more alike than different.

At least four home amateur films are in the National Film Registry and many more can be viewed in the Library’s National Screening Room.

With the hope to inspire more home filmmakers, we spotlight “Our Day,” added to the Registry in 2007, with an essay by Film Archivist Margaret Compton. “Our Day” is a day-in-the-life portrait of the Kelly family of Lebanon, Kentucky.

The film documents Wallace Kelly and his family’s sophisticated interests and simple lifestyle. The amateur “cast” features Kelly’s mother, wife, brother and pet terrier. Wallace Kelly, a newspaperman, was also an accomplished photographer, painter, and writer. He began shooting film in 1929 and continued until the 1950s.

Source: From the National Film Registry: Home Movie Day | Now See Hear!

On the Film Registry: “National Lampoon’s Animal House” (1978): An Interview with Tim Matheson | Now See Hear! | library of congress

August 2, 2021 by Stacie Seifrit-Griffin

 Animal House still, courtesy of Tim Matheson

It was 20 years ago that the Library of Congress added “National Lampoon’s Animal House” to the National Film Registry.

Originally released in 1978 and inducted in 2001, “Animal House” remains one of the most quoted and iconic comedy films in history.

In his book, “America’s Film Legacy: The Authoritative Guide To The Landmark Movies In The National Film Registry,” author Daniel Eagan says “National Lampoon’s Animal House” has become one of the most influential comedies of the 1970’s.

Embraced by younger viewers, it has been used as a blueprint by a succeeding generation of comedy filmmakers.”

Source: On the Film Registry: “National Lampoon’s Animal House” (1978): An Interview with Tim Matheson | Now See Hear!

Women Rule 2019 National Film Registry | Library of Congress

“Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today the annual selection of 25 of America’s most influential motion pictures to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Selected because of their cultural, historic and aesthetic importance to the nation’s film heritage, the films in the class of 2019 range from Prince’s 1984 autobiographical hit “Purple Rain” and Spike Lee’s 1986 breakout movie “She’s Gotta Have It” to Disney’s 1959 timeless fairy tale “Sleeping Beauty” and this year’s biggest public vote getter, Kevin Smith’s 1994 “Clerks.” ”

man holding clapper board
Photo by Martin Lopez on Pexels.com

via Women Rule 2019 National Film Registry | Library of Congress

With “20,000 Leagues,” the National Film Registry Reaches 700 | Library of Congress

National Film Registry logo, source: Wikipedia
Source: Wikipedia

“Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today the annual selection of 25 motion pictures that have been inducted into the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress because of their cultural, historic or aesthetic importance.  This year’s titles range from the Disney animated blockbuster “The Lion King” and the seminal coming-of-age drama “The Breakfast Club” to the 1990 documentary “Paris Is Burning,” chronicling the pageantry of drag balls in New York City, and a collection of home movies showcasing African-American life in Oklahoma during the 1920s.“

Source: With “20,000 Leagues,” the National Film Registry Reaches 700 | Library of Congress