Tag Archives: Jobs

The 10 fastest-growing science and technology jobs of the next decade | CNBC

Published Mon, Oct 11 202110:51 AM EDT, by Morgan Smith@thewordsmithm

Female scientist using pipette in modern research laboratory
Morsa Images | DigitalVision | Getty Images

While the coronavirus pandemic has battered some industries, others have thrived despite the ongoing crisis, including technology and science.

In fact, according to new data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, demand for jobs in math, science and technology will continue to surge over the next decade.

Hiring in the computer and information technology fields has faster projected growth between 2020 and 2030 than all other fields. The Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that demand for these workers stems from companies’ “greater emphasis on cloud computing, the collection and storage of big data, and information security.”

The coronavirus pandemic has expedited demand for other science and technology roles as well, including epidemiologists and information security analysts. “The prevalence of remote work has created additional need for network security and operations support,” Megan Slabinski, the district president for global talent solutions at recruitment firm Robert Half, tells CNBC Make It. Slabinski specializes in recruiting for technology positions.

JobProjected Growth RateMedian Pay
Statisticians35.40%$92,270
Information security analysts33.30%$103,590
Data scientists and mathematical science occupations31.40%$98,230
Epidemiologists29.60%$74,560
Operations research analysts24.60%$86,200
Actuaries24.50%$111,030
Software developers and software quality assurance analysts, testers22.20%$110,140
Computer and information research scientists21.90%$126,830
Medical scientists (except epidemiologists)16.90%$91,510
Forensic science technicians15.60%$60,590
From article…

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Get the data

Source: The 10 fastest-growing science and technology jobs of the next decade

Why Are So Many Knowledge Workers Quitting? | The New Yorker

The coronavirus pandemic threw everyone into Walden Pond.

By Cal Newport, August 16, 2021

An empty desk and chair in a sparse room.
During the pandemic, many knowledge workers have been embracing career downsizing, voluntarily reducing their work hours to emphasize other aspects of life.Photograph from Getty

Last spring, a friend of mine, a writer and executive coach named Brad Stulberg, received a troubling call from one of his clients. The client, an executive, had suddenly started losing many of his best employees, and he couldn’t really explain why. “This was the canary in the coal mine,” Stulberg said.

In the weeks that followed, more clients began sharing stories of unusually high staff attrition. “They were asking me, ‘Am I doing something wrong?’ ” Stulberg was especially well suited to help the executives he advises grasp the mind-set of their exiting employees.

Before the pandemic, Stulberg had been working on a book, “The Practice of Groundedness,” which argues for a values-based approach to defining and pursuing success. The research process led him to question his own professional situation. He lived with his wife and their young son in an apartment in Oakland, California.

He was on staff as an internal coach for Kaiser Permanente, a health-care company. He also ran his own small, community-based coaching practice, wrote books and freelance magazine articles, and delivered paid lectures. His new book emphasized the imperatives of presence and developing community ties, but Stulberg didn’t have the time to act on these principles, as he felt that he had to work constantly to keep up with the high cost of living in Oakland. “The laptop was always out,” he said.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: Why Are So Many Knowledge Workers Quitting? | The New Yorker

Rising number of Baby Boomers retirements may create ‘eye-opening’ changes, jobs, business, economy, Dayton, Kettering | Dayton daily news

Local News | July 17, 2021, By Nick Blizzard

The growing number of Baby Boomer retirements nationwide is accelerating, raising concerns locally about losing a large chunk of the workforce sooner than expected.

Data shows nearly 6 million more Boomers in the U.S. retired from October 2020 through March of this year than the same period a year prior, creating a larger void than anticipated in an economy seeking to fill jobs across an array of industries and recover from the woes of the coronavirus pandemic.

Source: Rising number of Baby Boomers retirements may create ‘eye-opening’ changes, jobs, business, economy, Dayton, Kettering

San Diego will re-open final 10 library branches by September, fully restore hours by June – The San Diego Union-Tribune

Post-pandemic re-opening has been delayed by decision to replace 170 hourly jobs with positions with benefits

By David Garrick, July 13, 2021 5:40 PM PT

(James Gregg /U-T)

SAN DIEGO — All of San Diego’s 36 library branches will re-open by September and overall branch hours across the system will return to pre-pandemic levels by next June, head librarian Misty Jones said Tuesday.

The city more than doubled the number of branches open to the public for in-person services from 12 to 26 on July 6. Jones said the 10 remaining branches are slated to re-open in either mid-September or late September.

Editor’s Note: Good article by Dave, who covers the library. I am a retired librarian from SDPL, working for 15 years there. Maybe some of those benefited positions will be at Central, to help save government documents. See more at my page about the documents’ collections:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/savegovdocssdpl

Source: San Diego will re-open final 10 library branches by September, fully restore hours by June – The San Diego Union-Tribune

Unemployment Benefits Are Not Creating A Worker Shortage | HuffPost

While some employers may be struggling to hire for one reason or another, economists say generous unemployment benefits are not the cause.

By Arthur Delaney and Dave Jamieson, 05/04/2021 10:41 am ET Updated 1 day ago

MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images via Getty Images Wages may have risen a bit faster than average this year in the hospitality industry, according to the government’s employment cost index, though state minimum wage laws may have played a role.

As the U.S. economy bounces back from the COVID-induced downturn, some employers say they’re having a hard time finding workers.

GOP lawmakers like Rep. David Rouzer (N.C.) blame the safety net.

“This is what happens when you extend unemployment benefits too long and add a $1400 stimulus payment,” Rouzer said on Twitter last week, posting a photo from a Hardee’s that said it was closed for lack of staff.

“Right when employers need workers to fully open back up, few can be found.”

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…


Source: Unemployment Benefits Are Not Creating A Worker Shortage | HuffPost

Students are being prepared for jobs that no longer exist. Here’s how that could change.

As automation disrupts the labor market and good middle-class jobs disappear, schools are struggling to equip students with future-proof skills.

Source: Students are being prepared for jobs that no longer exist. Here’s how that could change.