Tag Archives: Economics

The 10 fastest-growing science and technology jobs of the next decade | CNBC

Published Mon, Oct 11 202110:51 AM EDT, by Morgan Smith@thewordsmithm

Female scientist using pipette in modern research laboratory
Morsa Images | DigitalVision | Getty Images

While the coronavirus pandemic has battered some industries, others have thrived despite the ongoing crisis, including technology and science.

In fact, according to new data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, demand for jobs in math, science and technology will continue to surge over the next decade.

Hiring in the computer and information technology fields has faster projected growth between 2020 and 2030 than all other fields. The Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that demand for these workers stems from companies’ “greater emphasis on cloud computing, the collection and storage of big data, and information security.”

The coronavirus pandemic has expedited demand for other science and technology roles as well, including epidemiologists and information security analysts. “The prevalence of remote work has created additional need for network security and operations support,” Megan Slabinski, the district president for global talent solutions at recruitment firm Robert Half, tells CNBC Make It. Slabinski specializes in recruiting for technology positions.

JobProjected Growth RateMedian Pay
Statisticians35.40%$92,270
Information security analysts33.30%$103,590
Data scientists and mathematical science occupations31.40%$98,230
Epidemiologists29.60%$74,560
Operations research analysts24.60%$86,200
Actuaries24.50%$111,030
Software developers and software quality assurance analysts, testers22.20%$110,140
Computer and information research scientists21.90%$126,830
Medical scientists (except epidemiologists)16.90%$91,510
Forensic science technicians15.60%$60,590
From article…

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Get the data

Source: The 10 fastest-growing science and technology jobs of the next decade

The California Dream Is Dying – The Atlantic

The once-dynamic state is closing the door on economic opportunity.

By Conor Friedersdorf, July 21, 2021

About the author: Conor Friedersdorf is a California-based staff writer at The Atlantic, where he focuses on politics and national affairs. He is the founding editor of The Best of Journalism, a newsletter devoted to exceptional nonfiction.

Emily Haasch

Behold California, colossus of the West Coast: the most populous American state; the world’s fifth-largest economy; and arguably the most culturally influential, exporting Google searches and Instagram feeds and iPhones and Teslas and Netflix Originals and kimchi quesadillas.

This place inspires awe.

If I close my eyes I can see silhouettes of Joshua trees against a desert sunrise; seals playing in La Jolla’s craggy coves of sun-spangled, emerald seawater; fog rolling over the rugged Sonoma County coast at sunset into primeval groves of redwoods that John Steinbeck called “ambassadors from another time.”

–from article

This landscape is bejeweled with engineering feats: the California Aqueduct; the Golden Gate Bridge; and the ribbon of Pacific Coast Highway that stretches south of Monterey, clings to the cliffs of Big Sur, and descends the kelp-strewn Central Coast, where William Hearst built his Xanadu on a hillside where his zebras still graze.

No dreamscape better inspires dreamers. Millions still immigrate to my beloved home to improve both their prospects and ours.

Yet I fear for California’s future. The generations that reaped the benefits of the postwar era in what was the most dynamic place in the world should be striving to ensure that future generations can pursue happiness as they did. Instead, they are poised to take the California Dream to their graves by betraying a promise the state has offered from the start.


Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: The California Dream Is Dying – The Atlantic