Tag Archives: Brain

Scientists find key brain abnormality that may explain why some people are psychopaths | ZME Science

A brain region that is associated with reward perception and impulsive behavior is 10% larger in psychopaths.

ByTibi Puiu, June 2, 2022, in Health & Medicine, News, Psychology

Credit:Pixabay.

Psychopathy is one of the most recognizable and well-studied personality disorders — and for good reason too: it can sometimes be deadly dangerous.

But with all the research that’s been poured into studying psychopathy and its anti-social traits, we still don’t have a clear picture as to what causes it.

Like other developmental disorders, there is not one single cause of psychopathy, with research indicating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors that work together to shape people into psychopaths. These factors could manifest themselves in fundamental biological differences at the neural level between psychopathic and non-psychopathic people — and a new study may have just spotted one such biological difference. …

By looking at the brain scans of the individuals who scored higher on the psychopathy test, the researchers noticed that an area of the forebrain, known as the striatum, was about 10% larger in psychopathic people compared to individuals with low or no psychopathic traits.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: Scientists find key brain abnormality that may explain why some people are psychopaths

4 New Scientific Findings About Hugging | Psychology Today

Sebastian Ocklenburg, Ph.D., The Asymmetric Brain, and Posted February 20, 2022 | Reviewed by Jessica Schrader

crop psychologist taking notes during appointment
Photo by SHVETS production on Pexels.com

Key points

  • Research shows that getting hugged by others, but also hugging yourself, may reduce stress hormones.
  • Longer hugs are perceived as more pleasant than shorter hugs.
  • Older people who at least occasionally get hugs tend to feel better about their health.

During the COVID-19 pandemic and associated lockdowns and restrictions, one of the things many people missed most was getting hugged by their loved ones.

This led to an increased interest in the positive effects of hugging in the psychology research community and several studies published over the last year have yielded new insights on what it means to us to get hugged.

Here are four of the most interesting new insights into the science of hugging.

1. Getting hugged by others, but also hugging yourself, reduces stress hormones

A recent study by researcher Aljoscha Dreisoerner from the Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany, and his team focused on the positive effects of hugging on stress (Dreisoerner et al., 2021). Interestingly, the scientists not only investigated how getting hugged by other people could reduce stress, but also whether hugging yourself (e.g., when other people are not available during a lockdown) does also have a positive effect on stress. The scientists stressed 159 volunteers using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a standard stress induction method in which people are stressed by asking them to perform a fake job interview. Volunteers also gave saliva samples, so their cortisol (an important stress hormone) could be measured. Volunteers were assigned to three different conditions. They either were hugged for 20 seconds by an assistant of the scientists, hugged themselves for 20 seconds, or received no hugs and were asked to build a paper plane.

The results showed clearly that volunteers in both the hugging and the self-hugging condition showed lower cortisol levels than those in the control condition. Thus, getting hugged by other people, but also hugging oneself, reduces the negative effects of stress.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: 4 New Scientific Findings About Hugging | Psychology Today