How to cool your home without air conditioning during heat waves – The Washington Post

In a summer of deadly heat, passive cooling can keep people safe and curb carbon emissions. Here are the simple steps you can take.

By Sarah Kaplan, July 23, 2021 at 10:05 a.m. EDT

(Washington Post illustration; iStock)

As the mercury ticked upward in Portland, Ore., last month, I braced for my apartment to become unbearable.

Normally, my un-air-conditioned basement unit would be fine for the Pacific Northwest’s temperate summers. But these are not normal times.

Climate change has lengthened and intensified heat waves, pushing temperatures to unheard-of extremes. In Portland, a new all-time high was set three days in a row: First, 108 degrees Fahrenheit. Then 113 degrees. Then 116.

To my astonishment, the apartment stayed tolerable all weekend. The tile floors seemed to emanate coolness. The greenery surrounding my windows blocked direct sunlight and helped bring down the temperature of the outside air. I didn’t have a thermometer, but my guess is that the temperature inside never got above 80 degrees.

Source: How to cool your home without air conditioning during heat waves – The Washington Post