Tag Archives: Forgetting

3 types of normal forgetting — and 1 that isn’t | Ideas.Ted.com

September 16, 2022, By Lisa Genova

iStock

To be human is to forget things. But you’ve probably wondered: “When is forgetting normal, and when is it not?”

Here are four examples.

1. Forgetting where you parked
Not remembering where you parked because you didn’t pay attention is normal and different than what happens with Alzheimer’s. If you have Alzheimer’s, let’s say you park in a mall garage and shop for an hour. When you return to the parking garage, you’re not wondering if you parked on level three or level four, you’re thinking, “I don’t remember how I got here.” Or you’re standing in front of your car, but you don’t recognize it as yours.

Bonus:

See her TED Talk: https://www.ted.com/talks/lisa_genova_what_you_can_do_to_prevent_alzheimer_s

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: 3 types of normal forgetting — and 1 that isn’t |

Keep Forgetting Things? Neuroscience Says These 5 Habits Improve Memory and Leadership | Inc.com

Let’s go to the neuroscience: five specific tricks to improve memory and recall things better.

By Bill Murphy Jr., http://www.billmurphyjr.com @BillMurphyJr

Photo: Getty Images

When you forget things, you fall short: What time was that meeting tomorrow? Was it April who said she might want to become a customer in August, or was it August who said to call him next April?

Wait, what was the third thing?

I joke of course, but if there’s one thing many business leaders worry about — especially as they grow a bit older — it’s whether their memories have suffered. So, let’s go to the neuroscience: five specific tricks to improve memory and recall things better.

1. Walk backward. Let’s start with my favorite on the list, because the neuroscientists who came up with it can’t even explain why it works. Researchers from the University of Roehampton in London divided their subjects into three groups. In Group 1, participants were asked to watch a short movie, or memorize words, or study a set of pictures while walking forward. In Group 2, participants completed the same tasks while walking backward. In Group 3, participants acted as a control group, doing the same tasks but standing still.

Source: Keep Forgetting Things? Neuroscience Says These 5 Habits Improve Memory and Leadership | Inc.com

Why We Forget Things, According to Neuroscience | Time

By Corinne Purtill, April 28, 2022 7:00 AM EDT

Studies on the brains of zebrafish, like the one shown here, are helping scientists better understand memory, and the power of forgetting.
Illustration by TIME (Source image: Zhuowei Du)

A baby zebrafish is just half the size of a pea. A recent look inside its transparent brain, however, offers clues to the far bigger mystery of how we remember—and how we forget.

In an experiment that yielded insights into memory and the brain, a team of researchers at the University of Southern California taught the tiny creature to associate a bright light with a flash of heat, a temperature change the fish responded to by trying to swim away.

Using a custom-designed microscope, the team then captured images of the animals’ brains in the moments before and after they learned to associate the light and the heat. It’s the first known look at how a living vertebrate’s brain restructures itself as the animal forms a memory.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: Why We Forget Things, According to Neuroscience | Time