Tag Archives: Internet

What Is Your Earliest Memory of the Internet? | The Signal

July 27, 2022 by Tracee Haupt

DCMS members present at the Open House, including (from L-R) Abigail Shelton and Carlyn Osborn representing By the People, Hana Beckerle and Kate Murray representing FADGI, and Lauren Baker representing the Web Archives

What is your earliest memory of the internet?

The Web Archiving Team and our colleagues in the Digital Content Management Section asked this question during an open house for attendees of the American Library Association’s annual conference, where we had a table set up to share information about our work.

As an ice breaker, we asked everyone who visited our table to write down their earliest memory of the internet on yellow post-it notes, and by the end of the night, we had over a hundred.

Source: What Is Your Earliest Memory of the Internet? | The Signal

What ‘Cunningham’s Law’ Really Tells Us About How We Interact Online | lifehacker

By Stephen Johnson, 4/01/22 9:00AM

Illustration: “Duty Calls”/xkcd – Creative Commons (Fair Use)

I’m sure you’re familiar with the XKCD comic “Duty Calls” in which an internet user is passionately typing away late into the night because “someone is wrong on the internet!”

The comic illustrates Cunningham’s Law, the tongue-in-cheek axiom that states “the best way to get the right answer on the internet is not to ask a question, it’s to post the wrong answer.”

The principle behind Cunningham’s Law isn’t new—there’s even a French saying that translates to “preach the falsehood to know the truth”—but even though it’s well-established, Cunningham’s Law is hardly an effective way to gather information online—and actually tells us more about how the internet seems to invite us to disagree about everything.

Source: What ‘Cunningham’s Law’ Really Tells Us About How We Interact Online