Tag Archives: George Lucas

The Literary Star Wars, a History | Literary Hub

Ok, people, it’s here. December 18th, 2015. Star Wars Day.Nerds around the world are celebrating what has to be the most significant day in fan history since, well, May 25, 1977. The long-awaited sequel to Return of the Jedi (1983), Star Wars: Episode VII: The Force Awakens is in theaters.To celebrate this momentous occasion, I’d like to present a brief history of George Lucas’s first Star Wars film and a literary primer for J.J. Abrams’s new one. Enjoy, dorks!

Source: The Literary Star Wars, a History | Literary Hub

‘Star Wars: The Force Awakens’ Delivers the Thrills, With a Touch of Humanity – The New York Times

 “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” features some favorites, including Harrison Ford, and new kinetic wows. Credit Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures
“Star Wars: The Force Awakens” features some favorites, including Harrison Ford, and new kinetic wows. Credit Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

The big news about “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” is — spoiler alert — that it’s good! Despite the prerelease hype, it won’t save the world, not even Hollywood, but it seamlessly balances cozy favorites — Harrison Ford, ladies and gentlemen — and new kinetic wows along with some of the niceties that went missing as the series grew into a phenomenon, most crucially a scale and a sensibility that is rooted in the human. It has the usual toy-store-ready gizmos and critters, but it also has appealingly imperfect men and women whose blunders and victories, decency and goofiness remind you that a pop mythology like “Star Wars” needs more than old gods to sustain it.

Source: ‘Star Wars: The Force Awakens’ Delivers the Thrills, With a Touch of Humanity – The New York Times

The Untold Story of ILM, a Titan That Forever Changed Film | WIRED

No one wanted Star Wars when George Lucas started shopping it to studios in the mid-1970s. It was the era of Taxi Driver and Network and Serpico; Hollywood was hot for authenticity and edgy drama, not popcorn space epics. But that was only part of the problem.

via The Untold Story of ILM, a Titan That Forever Changed Film | WIRED.


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