Tag Archives: Art

Summer Beauties: The Golden Age of Travel Posters | Library of Congress Blog

August 19, 2021 by Neely Tucker

This Depression-era Works Progress Administration Federal Art Project poster urged Americans to travel. Artist: Alexander Dux. Prints and Photographs Division.

Jan Grenci, a reference specialist in the Prints & Photographs Division, wrote a short piece about travel posters in the July/August issue of the Library of Congress Magazine.

It’s been expanded here. Some of the Library’s most popular Free to Use and Reuse photographs and prints are the travel posters from the golden age of the art form, the 1920s to the 1960s, when artists used graphic design, bold lines and deep colors to render destinations more as a mood than just a place.

Take, for example, that image above. The massive scale of the stalagmites and stalactites, the huge cavern opening — they combine to dwarf the man and woman in the foreground. The blueish/purple geologic formations, lit softly from the right, are offset by the shadows in deep black. She appears to be dressed in a skirt, blouse and (one hopes) sensible walking shoes; he, his hat at a jaunty angle, is clad in a coat, jodhpurs and riding boots, complete with a gentleman’s walking stick. They appear not just to be enjoying a day’s hike so much as contemplating the immense passage of time itself.

Source: Summer Beauties: The Golden Age of Travel Posters | Library of Congress Blog

UC San Diego Library Launches New Art of Science Contest

The UC San Diego Library is hosting the inaugural Art of Science contest, which aims to celebrate the beauty that can emerge during scientific exploration and raise awareness of the Library’s data curation services.

Data curators at the UC San Diego Library have the privilege of working with researchers from a wide range of scientific disciplines as they prepare data for the Library’s Research Data Collections repository. The visually stunning nature of some of these research data sets has inspired the Library’s Research Data Curation Program (RDCP) to host its inaugural Art of Science contest, which aims to celebrate the beauty that can emerge during scientific exploration and raise awareness of the Library’s data curation services.

Source: UC San Diego Library Launches New Art of Science Contest

How To Talk About Art History – It’s easier than it seems.

Art historian who wants to make art history more accessible and understandable to everyone. Ask me any question about art history and I’ll answer it.

Source: How To Talk About Art History – It’s easier than it seems.

How Audiobooks Are Becoming an Art Form Unto Themselves

Photo Illustration by Sarah Rogers/The Daily Beast
Photo Illustration by Sarah Rogers/The Daily Beast

Audiobooks are here to stay—and that’s good news for readers.

Source: How Audiobooks Are Becoming an Art Form Unto Themselves

‘Dream of a House’ tours the eclectic home of writer Reynolds Price – LA Times

“What can things — furniture, everyday objects, art — really tell us about someone? If this book is any indication, plenty. What Price chose to surround himself with tells us about his obsessions, his affections, and perhaps even his perception of himself.”

Source: ‘Dream of a House’ tours the eclectic home of writer Reynolds Price – LA Times

Free to Use and Reuse: Travel Posters | Library of Congress Blog

“Faraway states, natural wonders and beautiful beaches—these are the settings that often come to mind as we start to plan our summer vacations. They also form the backdrop of hundreds of travel posters in the Library’s collections, including an assortment featured this month on the Library’s home page. The featured posters are U.S. government works, in the public domain or cleared for public use by copyright owners—meaning you can use them as you wish.”

Post about travel posters that have no rights restrictions.

See also.. another example.. https://www.loc.gov/resource/cph.3g12528/

Frank Hazell’s poster of West Point as seen from the window of a train car.
Frank Hazell’s poster of West Point as seen from the window of a train car.

Source: Free to Use and Reuse: Travel Posters | Library of Congress Blog