Appreciating the mystery of “Endeavour” as the detective prequel approaches the end | Salon.com

After 10 years as the youthful version of a great TV detective, have we taken Shaun Evans’ Morse for granted?

By Melanie McFarland, Published June 19, 2022 3:30PM (EDT)

Shaun Evans as Morse in “Endeavor” (Courtesy of Mammoth Screen and MASTERPIECE)

Sometimes I contemplate an alternate timeline where “Sherlock” never existed and wonder whether “Endeavour” and its star Shaun Evans may have claimed whatever secret chamber in our hearts that Benedict Cumberbatch’s detective conquered.

The two detectives have a few things in common, after all. Sherlock Holmes and Endeavour Morse are two of many crime-solvers adapted from literature featured under the “Masterpiece Mystery!” tent recently interpreted as younger men in their prime.

Each has a long relationship with television, although Holmes’ overcoat has been worn by an assortment of actors. Morse is associated with two: Evans and the late John Thaw, who originated the character in “Inspector Morse,” which aired from 1987 through 1993, and was revived for five special installments that ran between 1995 and 2000.

Source: Appreciating the mystery of “Endeavour” as the detective prequel approaches the end | Salon.com

The Organization of Your Bookshelves Tells Its Own Story – The Atlantic

The complexity of the human heart can be expressed in the arrangement of one’s books.

By Leslie Kendall Dye, June 19, 2022, 7 AM ET

Getty ; The Atlantic

My father loved books more than anything else in the world. He owned about 11,000 of them at the time of his death, in March of 2021, at 83 years old.

There were books in his living room and bedroom, books in the hallways and closets and kitchen. Sometimes I stop in the center of my own home like a bird arrested in flight, entranced by the books that line my walls. I live in a small Manhattan apartment, and I, too, have books in the living room, the bedroom, the hallway, the closets.

Often, I stare at them because I’m puzzling over their geography. I wonder if I’ve placed any book in the wrong spot, according to an emotional map I’ve made of my bookshelves. As I gaze at the titles, the associations come tumbling out.

Tennessee Williams’s Memoirs is next to a biography of Patrick Dennis called Uncle Mame, because Williams and Dennis had many things in common: Pathos. Cruel fathers. Spectacular female characters. A Dictionary of Yiddish Slang & Idioms is next to Heartburn because, however secular Nora Ephron was, her humor comes from deep within her Jewishness.

The Lord of the Rings is between Time and Again and Rosemary’s Baby because I like how they form a triumvirate of fantasy stories that have nothing in common save my personal opinion that they are the finest of their genre. (Many would argue that Rosemary’s Baby belongs in horror, not fantasy, but my system allows for the blurring of these lines.)

Source: The Organization of Your Bookshelves Tells Its Own Story – The Atlantic

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