Category Archives: Web & Technology

Web & Technology

The 10 fastest-growing science and technology jobs of the next decade | CNBC

Published Mon, Oct 11 202110:51 AM EDT, by Morgan Smith@thewordsmithm

Female scientist using pipette in modern research laboratory
Morsa Images | DigitalVision | Getty Images

While the coronavirus pandemic has battered some industries, others have thrived despite the ongoing crisis, including technology and science.

In fact, according to new data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, demand for jobs in math, science and technology will continue to surge over the next decade.

Hiring in the computer and information technology fields has faster projected growth between 2020 and 2030 than all other fields. The Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that demand for these workers stems from companies’ “greater emphasis on cloud computing, the collection and storage of big data, and information security.”

The coronavirus pandemic has expedited demand for other science and technology roles as well, including epidemiologists and information security analysts. “The prevalence of remote work has created additional need for network security and operations support,” Megan Slabinski, the district president for global talent solutions at recruitment firm Robert Half, tells CNBC Make It. Slabinski specializes in recruiting for technology positions.

JobProjected Growth RateMedian Pay
Statisticians35.40%$92,270
Information security analysts33.30%$103,590
Data scientists and mathematical science occupations31.40%$98,230
Epidemiologists29.60%$74,560
Operations research analysts24.60%$86,200
Actuaries24.50%$111,030
Software developers and software quality assurance analysts, testers22.20%$110,140
Computer and information research scientists21.90%$126,830
Medical scientists (except epidemiologists)16.90%$91,510
Forensic science technicians15.60%$60,590
From article…

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Get the data

Source: The 10 fastest-growing science and technology jobs of the next decade

St. Louis city, county libraries to integrate catalogs, totaling 5 million items | Books | stltoday.com

By Jane Henderson, Sep 29, 2021

Donna Kniest, of Brentwood, left, and Pam Mahoney, of Webster Groves, pick up the books they had on hold last year from the holds section of the St. Louis County Library Headquarters. “I’ve been anxiously awaiting the reopening,” said Pam. The library reopened on June 18, 2020, after being closed early in the coronavirus pandemic.

A catalog of almost 5 million items — from books to DVDs — will be created next year when the St. Louis city and county integrate their library systems.

The two aren’t combining libraries, but they are making it easier for residents to access materials, they said in a news release Wednesday.

If a person in south St. Louis, for example, wants to check out a book unavailable in the city library, he or she can request it through the new integrated system and it will be delivered to a nearby city library.

Patrons will be able to use the library card they have and will not need to get a new one.

The city and county libraries have shared resources for 28 years through a reciprocal lending agreement. City residents could also get a county library card and vice versa, but borrowers usually had to travel farther to pick up materials.

The new shared catalog will be made available by using Polaris ILS (integrated library system), a product of Innovative Interfaces Inc. A spokeswoman for the county library said sharing a system will save both libraries money.

Editor’s Note: This approach should be applicable to many large libraries, often a city library and county library in big metropolitan areas. For example,

Editor’s Note: This approach should be applicable to many large libraries, often a city library and county library in big metropolitan areas. For example,

SAN DIEGO COUNTY LIBRARY1,281,922
Source: https://ca.countingopinions.com/pireports/view_dashboard.php?pkey=626437c4d376728d7b0313240656d821&live
SAN DIEGO PUBLIC LIBRARY2,539,784
Source: https://ca.countingopinions.com/pireports/view_dashboard.php?pkey=626437c4d376728d7b0313240656d821&live

Their combined catalog, not allowing for duplicates, would be 3,821,706 items.

Source: St. Louis city, county libraries to integrate catalogs, totaling 5 million items | Books | stltoday.com

Google search’s next phase: context is king – The Verge

Google says search is still far from solved

By Dieter Bohn@backlon Sep 29, 2021, 1:42pm EDT

Google Lens will let users search using images and refine their query with text.
Image: Google

At its Search On event today, Google introduced several new features that, taken together, are its strongest attempts yet to get people to do more than type a few words into a search box.

By leveraging its new Multitask Unified Model (MUM) machine learning technology in small ways, the company hopes to kick off a virtuous cycle: it will provide more detail and context-rich answers, and in return it hopes users will ask more detailed and context-rich questions.

The end result, the company hopes, will be a richer and deeper search experience.

Source: Google search’s next phase: context is king – The Verge

Times Are Changing: COVID-19 and Library Late Fees | Book Riot

By Tika Viteri, Sep 24, 2021

From article…

Almost any reader with a library card will be familiar with the concept of library fines.

Developing the ability able to return my books on time and not incur a fine was basically the only reason I ever learned to read a calendar as a child. Here is where I confess that despite having a calendar of my very own, I was still terrible at returning books on time and often spent my entire allowance on fines.

Libraries have been collecting fines since at least the late 1800s, originally using them to generate revenue for the library and also, in an example of strict father morality, to punish those who cannot adhere to arbitrary timelines.

When researching for this article, I was surprised to learn that research on going fine-free has been published since as far back as the 1970s. Similar to other movements involved with equality and equity, it took several decades — and in this case, a global pandemic — to put the idea across the finish line.

Source: Times Are Changing: COVID-19 and Library Late Fees

The September 11, 2001 Web Archive: Twenty Years Later | Library of Congress | The Signal

Published September 22, 2021, by Carlyn Osborn

Today’s guest post is from Tracee Haupt, a Digital Collection Specialist in the Digital Content Management section at the Library of Congress.

The website for the French newspaper Le Monde, shown here in a capture taken shortly after September 11th, is an example of the international scope of the September 11, 2001 Web Archive.

On the twentieth anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks, I asked four individuals who were part of the creation of the September 11, 2001 Web Archive to reflect on their experience documenting the tragedy and the unique contents of the collection.

In addition to the archive’s historical significance as a record of how a variety of individuals and organizations responded to September 11th, the collection is also important as an example of an early web archiving project, when both the internet and the Library of Congress’ (LC) efforts to preserve it were still relatively new.

In this post, current and former Library employees describe how the collection came to be, what they learned while creating it, and why preserving this aspect of internet history was crucial to fully understanding the impact of September 11th.

Source: The September 11, 2001 Web Archive: Twenty Years Later | The Signal

What artificial intelligence means for homebuyers, real estate market | CNBC | Real Estate

By Diana Olick, Published Fri, Sep 17 202112:15 PM EDT

https://www.cnbc.com/video/2021/09/16/artificial-intelligence-takes-over-the-real-estate-industry.html

Photo by Binyamin Mellish on Pexels.com

Brick-and-mortar real estate may seem like the only tangible thing left in an increasingly virtual world, but it too is being taken over by artificial intelligence.

Some of the biggest names in the business, such as Compass, Zillow and LoanSnap, are now employing AI to help find buyers the perfect mortgage and the perfect home. And for real estate agents, it may already be a game-changer.

Most real estate data is public, from land records to title documents, purchase price and even mortgage liens. The trouble was it was an onerous process to go to local offices and obtain all the information. Not anymore.

Computer algorithms can now go through millions of documents in seconds, looking through property values, debt levels, home renovations, and even some of a homeowner’s personal information.

At LoanSnap, a San Francisco-based mortgage lender, AI is used in various steps of the mortgage process, from finding the perfect loan type for a borrower to finding the right investor for the loan.

Source: What artificial intelligence means for homebuyers, real estate market