Category Archives: Science & Health

Science and health issues or matters. Find health items for virus COVID-19 in this category.

Femme fatale: The images that reveal male fears – BBC Culture

Three new exhibitions explore how the femme fatale in art reflects evolving anxieties, writes Cath Pound.

By Cath Pound, 31st January 2023

(Image credit: Hamburger Kunsthalle, Photo: Elke Walford)

The figure of the femme fatale is one of the defining literary and artistic motifs of the 19th and early 20th Centuries.

Artists were drawn to historical archetypes of female seduction such as Cleopatra or Lucretia Borgia, characters from Old Testament stories including Salome, Judith and Delilah, or mythical figures such as Circe, Helen of Troy and Medea.

Others were conjured from their male author’s imagination – Prosper Mérimée’s Carmen, Émile Zola’s Nana and Frank Wedekind’s Lulu being some of the most notable.

Her emergence is frequently seen as a response to anxieties arising from profound social change as women pushed for greater economic, political and educational rights, challenging the established patriarchal order.

Middle-class women who sought education were, according to the British psychiatrist Henry Maudsley, likely to damage their reproductive organs, turning them into monstrosities who threatened the survival of the human race. Fear of contagious diseases such as syphilis was another factor, with working-class prostitutes being seen as contemporary femmes fatales who could lure their clients to their doom.

Continue reading Femme fatale: The images that reveal male fears – BBC Culture

NASA Spinoffs Bolster Climate Resilience, Improve Medical Care, More | Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Cal Tech

JPL-developed technologies, including VITAL, FINDER, 3D-printing methods, and Voyager spacecraft communications, are featured in the agency’s technology publication.

Published Jan. 31, 2023

To make sure ventilators could be quickly manufactured and administered to those in need during the COVID-19 pandemic, a team of engineers at JPL created the Ventilator Intervention Technology Accessible Locally (VITAL) device, made of off-the-shelf parts.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

When it comes to NASA, most people look to the skies as rockets, rovers, and astronauts push the boundaries of space exploration. But the benefits of going above and beyond can be found here on Earth through products and services born from NASA innovation.

Editor’s Note: Read more, see link below for original item…

Source: NASA Spinoffs Bolster Climate Resilience, Improve Medical Care, More

Artificial Intelligence and the Research Paper: A Librarian’s Perspective – News | SMU Libraries

By: Jonathan McMichael, Undergraduate Success Librarian
Screenshot…

AI writing can mimic style, but it cannot mimic substance yet. The release of a powerful, free and easy-to-use large language model platform, Open AI’s ChatGPT, raises interesting questions about the future of writing in higher education.

As the Undergraduate Success Librarian, I have a unique perspective on generative AI, like ChatGPT, that I want to share along with some advice for instructors and students on adapting to AI’s presence in higher education.

What is ChatGPT?

How does it work? ChatGPT is an interface that allows you to interact with artificial intelligence through text inputs and responses. The AI on the other side of the interface is a language model called GPT-3. It produces human-like text by parsing and analyzing the massive corpus of text information (large language) it has been trained on to predict what is likely to come next in a string of words. This makes GPT-3 a type of Generative AI because it uses machine learning to generate new content based on a given set of input data. So, when you give ChatGPT a prompt like “describe losing your sock in the dryer in the style of the declaration of independence” it (in simplified terms) identifies relevant data within its large language dataset, notices patterns within that dataset and then generates a set of text that seems most like the things it identified.*

Editor’s Note: Source was Library Link of the Day
http://www.tk421.net/librarylink/  (archive, rss, subscribe options)

Source: Artificial Intelligence and the Research Paper: A Librarian’s Perspective – News

Dan Levitt’s ‘What’s Gotten Into You’ traces atoms’ long trip from the big bang to the human body | CNN

By Bryn Nelson, CNN, Published 10:17 AM EST, Sun January 22, 2023

We are ever-changing and replacing old parts with new ones: our water, proteins and even cells.
Faisal/Adobe Stock

In its violent early years, Earth was a molten hellscape that ejected the moon after a fiery collision with another protoplanet, scientists now suspect.

Dan Levitt’s book, “What’s Gotten Into You,” reconstructs the journey of our atoms across billions of years.

Later, it morphed from a watery expanse to a giant snowball that nearly snuffed out all existing life.

Source: Dan Levitt’s ‘What’s Gotten Into You’ traces atoms’ long trip from the big bang to the human body | CNN

It’s Not What You’re Eating, It’s When You’re Eating | by Ashley Richmond | In Fitness And In Health | Medium

Time-restricted eating may be the easiest path to your health goals.

By Ashley Richmond, Dec 29, 2020

Health is confusing.

There are so many diets to choose from, exercises to try, and different people saying conflicting things about what is best.

For years, I have experimented with different diets and exercises to try to find the best one. And the truth is, there isn’t one. Diet and exercise are highly personal. You can read more about this here.

But there is one strategy that is universal: Time-restricted eating.

Source: It’s Not What You’re Eating, It’s When You’re Eating | by Ashley Richmond | In Fitness And In Health | Medium

Chest pads for sports: Do they protect against cardiac arrest? | NBC News

Do chest protectors keep kids safe on the playing field? The evidence is mixed, doctors say.

By Erika Edwards, Jan. 7, 2023, 12:15 PM PST

Screenshot from video in article…

Sports medicine specialist Dr. Kody Moffatt knows how seeing Damar Hamlin collapse in cardiac arrest on “Monday Night Football” has frightened parents of young athletes.

“Almost every family that I’ve seen in clinic since Tuesday morning has asked about this,” said Moffatt, division chief of sports medicine at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska.

“They were worried about chest impacts.

“Such life-threatening injuries are extremely rare, and though it now appears that the 24-year-old Buffalo Bills safety is recovering, the incident was a gut punch reminder of how quickly injuries can happen.

Source: Chest pads for sports: Do they protect against cardiac arrest?