The Real Places That Gave Rise to Southern Fictions | The New Yorker

By Casey Cep, January 12, 2022

“Church, Highway 47, Alabama, 2018.”

There is a cheap way of invoking the American South—common to country songs and television shows and pulpy novels—that involves setting the scene with cornfields or battlefields and setting the table with gravy and grits.

You know that you’re in the midst of it when an otherwise deracinated character drops his final “G”s and says something about livin’ high on the hog or complains about how it’s colder outside than a witch’s tit.

But it takes more than kudzu or a Mason jar to make a work of Southern fiction. A real sense of place requires something else—more verb than noun, not a thing but a way of being.

Editor’s Note; May be behind paywall, sorry…

Source: The Real Places That Gave Rise to Southern Fictions | The New Yorker

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